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Isle of Mull History Archive

Four Fantastic All-Day Walks on the Isle of Mull

Reconnecting with nature, recharging your batteries and exploring Mull’s most beautiful corners – this is the ambition of many who visit the island, and by simply carving a day out of your itinerary to dedicate to an all-day walk on the Isle of Mull, you can do exactly that.

Here are four ideas to get you started, with one for each corner of the island. Choose one or explore them all – the island is your oyster, enjoy it!

The view as you pass through the wildflower meadow, arriving at the dramatic coastal track.
The ‘false’ beach, with excellent views across to the Treshnish Isles to the west.

North Mull: The Treshnish Headland

This is a great choice for an all-day walk on the Isle of Mull that eases you in gently and rewards you with spectacular views. Beginning from the island’s west coast at the start of the Treshnish headland, just south of Calgary, a track takes you past Treshnish Farm and on towards the Coronation Meadow, where wild orchids and other native flowers grow in the breeze of the Atlantic.

Rounding the coast with views to the Treshnish Isles, you’ll pass over the ‘false’ beach – now a flat, grassy swathe, this was once at sea level! From here, the trail continues past the ruined village at Crackaig, before re-joining the single-track road to return to your starting point.

Rounding the headland as you make your way back towards Reudle.
Ruined villages found along the Treshnish walk, telling of more populous times before the Highland Clearances.

East Mull: Glenforsa and Ben Talaidh

Ben Talaidh in the distance, seen from Glenforsa with its resident Highland cows.
The propellor of the Dakota plane crash of 1945, which struck the mountain.
On your return, you can take an alternative route along the River Forsa.

Standing at almost 750m high, Ben Talaidh towers at the head of Glenforsa, and its iconic, conical peak can be seen from as far away as Tobermory in the island’s north east.

Climbing this Graham comes not only with fantastic scenery and views from the top though, as having followed the river Forsa through the farmed glen below, you’ll ascend past a bothy to the wreckage of a Dakota plane, which crashed into the mountain in 1945.

The summit affords excellent views across the island’s mountainous interior, west towards Loch Ba and Ben More, and east back to the Sound of Mull and mainland Scotland.

As you make your way through the glen, pass the MBA bothy at Tomsleibhe.
A wintry ascent of Ben Talaidh, with spectacular views to Mull’s mountainous interior.

South Mull: Tireregan Nature Reserve

The reward for your efforts is this remote and staggeringly beautiful stretch of coast.
The exquisite white sands of Traigh Gheal, so remote you’ll almost certainly be the only people there.

It always pays to be prepared when you head out walking on the Isle of Mull, but no where is this truer than of the Tireregan Nature Reserve. Although not featuring big ascents, the terrain here is challenging and you’ll navigate thick brush, woodland, bog and bracken as you make for the coast. For this reason, it’s a corner of Mull that often goes unexplored, feeling truly remote and untouched.

The reward for your efforts? A taste of Mull’s true wilderness, a wildlife haven, and one of the most unspoilt and beautiful beaches on the island – Traigh Gheal.

Bog, brush and bracken make up much of the route, best suited to experienced walkers.
Fantastic views as you cross challenging terrain in the Tireregan Nature Reserve.

West Mull: Ardmeanach and The Burg

The northern side of the Ardmeanach peninsula, beyond Balmeanach.
The Ardmeanach peninsula, looking out towards Burg, where the route to the fossil tree leads.

Another of Mull’s wildernesses, the Ardmeanach peninsula extends between Loch Scridain and Loch na Keal on the island’s south west coast. From the Scenic Route to Salen heading north, turn off towards Tiroran just after the small settlement of Kilfinichen and the adventure begins. It’s best to check the tides in advance, as the Fossil Tree at the end of the trail requires a low tide.

As you head west along the peninsula, you’ll pass a memorial cairn and the remains of Dun Bhuirg, affording historical interest along the way. Tracing the coastline, the views are rugged and spectacular. The grand finale of this walk is the Fossil Tree, cast in basalt lava and reached by an equally dramatic ladder bolted to the rocks! The return route retraces your steps, with excellent opportunity to enjoy the local wildlife as you go.

Descend the metal ladder when the tide is out to marvel at the geology and fossil tree.
Stunning rock formations and fossils are striking features on this remote part of the coast.

Find more inspiration for short to all-day walks on the Isle of Mull in our guide, complete with OS maps, route descriptions and photos.

Multi-tiered waterfall on the Ardmeanach peninsula

Outdoor Activities on Mull to Enjoy in Winter

Winter on a Hebridean island brings many things to mind – dramatic tides rolling onto exposed beaches, cosy nights beside the wood burning stove and wrapping up warm to watch for the Northern Lights. Whether your stay is filled with crisp winter sunshine or atmospheric seasonal storms, here are a few outdoor activities on Mull to enjoy in the quiet winter months.

northern lights over mull

1 Enjoy Stargazing

The long dark nights that cloak the Hebrides during the winter months offer a superb opportunity for budding astronomers and stargazers alike. Head out on a clear night and see what you can spot.

For the luckiest, cast your gaze northwards and you may even see the dancing colours of the Northern Lights, which are spotted here throughout the winter months when the solar energy is right. Find out more about stargazing on Mull.

2 Fossil Hunting

Not to collect and take home, but certainly to marvel at. On a bright, calm day, there are two paths to pick from.

For the adventurous, the dramatic route from Tiroran to the Fossil Tree (it’s known as the wilderness peninsula for a reason!) at low tide will take your breath away.

For an easier going amble, the circular walk at Ardtun on the Ross of Mull enables you to enjoy the stunning coastal scenery as you scout out fossil leaf beds, which once stood beside a prehistoric lake!

Silhouette of a red deer stag roaring at sunset on the Isle of Mull

3 Watch for Wildlife

During the winter months, the red deer descend from their home ranges in the hills and are often seen at lower levels, making winter an ideal time to see them up close.

Much of the island’s wildlife remains with us through the winter – the eagles, otters, seals and more call Mull home year-round. And then there are the seasonal visitors, for whom winter signals their season of return – keep an eye out for the rare Great Northern Diver among others.

4 Go Fishing

At this time of year, fisherman’s huts come in especially handy to shelter from the weather if needed. Tackle and Books in Tobermory are the people to ask to secure your permits to fish, with the Mishnish Lochs a pretty spot with shelter if you need it, or the Aros Park lochan, where you can take cover beneath the trees.

Duart Castle standing proudly on an outcrop in south east Mull, seen from the ferry as it approaches Craignure

5 Bag Castles

Make your first Duart Castle – while it closes its doors to visitors over the winter months, you’ll enjoy magnificent views of the castle as you approach Mull on the Oban to Craignure ferry.

From here, several beautiful castles await, some ornate and privately owned, like Glengorm, which can be seen from a distance on the walk to the Bathing Pools, or Torosay Castle, which peeks through the trees on a coastal walk from Craignure.

Others act as relics of the past, like the 16th century Aros Castle, where ruins remain statuesque on the hilltop beside Salen Bay and the Aros estuary. Moy Castle, visited by a beautiful coastal path from Lochbuie, is another castle majestic in its age and well worth the walk to.

6 Step Back in Time

Follow coastal paths to ruined villages that serve as a poignant reminder of the Highland Clearances island-wide. From the Ross of Mull, the path to Shiaba is a stunning, windswept coastal walk with pretty beaches to pass by.

Further north, walk the Treshnish Headland for more spectacular sea views, passing the ruined village of Crackaig as you go. From Tobermory, the walk to Ardmore Point is only a few minutes’ drive, where again, ruined cottages pay testament to times past.

Feeling inspired by these winter activities on Mull? Visit the island at its quietest and enjoy an excellent value winter break – choose from one of our cosy cottages available this winter.

10 Reasons to Visit the Ross of Mull

Whether you’ve booked a cottage in the island’s wild south west or are planning a day trip from Tobermory, discover 10 reasons to explore the Ross of Mull. From beaches to island hopping, wildlife to rocks, there’s plenty to inspire your next holiday on Mull.

Fidden beach on the Ross of Mull

1 Breath-taking Beaches

From Knockvologan’s sheltered coves, dotted with pink granite outcrops, to the glittering seascapes of Uisken and Ardalanish with views to outlying islands, to little known sandy beaches flanked by hills and reached by the adventurous – the Ross of Mull has it all. There are beaches you can park beside and beaches well off the beaten track. There’s even a beach rumoured to be a favourite among the Royals! Choose your favourites to visit with our guide to beaches on the Ross of Mull.

2 Isle of Iona

No where on Mull is it easier to experience the charming island of Iona, than from a cottage on the Ross of Mull. Whether you pick Pennyghael, Ardtun or even Loch Assapol as your location for the week, the short ferry crossing from Fionnphort to Iona is within easy reach. Iona makes an excellent day trip with a visit to the Abbey, a walk to hear the corncrakes in season, or a stroll to the beautiful Bay at the Back of the Ocean.

Sea eagle dives for fish

3 Wonderful Wildlife

Mull is well known as a wildlife capital and the Ross of Mull is no different. Spend some time exploring loch and land with the chance to encounter otters, white tailed sea eagles, golden eagles, red deer and seals. If you’re particularly lucky, you may even spot dolphins or a porpoise passing through the sea lochs, or escorting a local fishing boat back to shore. There are even cottages where you can watch wildlife from the window, with hen harriers often sighted from Keills Cottage.

4 Locally Landed Seafood

The Ross of Mull forms a narrow peninsula, bordered by sea on both sides. The proximity to the coast means seafood is often top of the menu. Enjoy the locally landed catch in a laid-back setting at the Creel Seafood Bar beside the ferry slipway in Fionnphort, or for fine dining, book a table at Ninth Wave.

Mull’s wilderness peninsula with a waterfall in reverse during high winds

5 Wilderness Peninsula

The beautiful waters of Loch Scridain carve their way along the north side of the Ross. Across the water, the dramatic Ardmeanach peninsula comes into view. This wildly beautiful area is easily reached by taking the road signposted the ‘Scenic Route to Salen’, then bearing off beside Kilfinichen Bay, following singposts for Tiroran and the Burg. From the designated parking area, there are dramatic landscapes to explore, with a day-long hike leading you to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree.

6 Great Geology

This part of Mull has a distinctly different geological makeup to much of the island. Pink granite rocks stand out in the landscape and glow beautifully come sunset. The beaches at Knockvologan and Fidden offer great examples, as does the walk past the disused quarry at Fionnphort. Further along the Ross, you can also explore the shoreline at Ardtun to encounter striking fossil leaf beds.

Carsaig Arches - a challenging walk on the south coast

7 Carsaig Arches

The amazing geology doesn’t stop there, because at Carsaig, arguably one of Mull’s most magnificent natural features awaits – the Carsaig Arches. Reached by a dramatic and nerve-tingling walk along challenging coastline, the route will test your bravery at times, but the reward when you reach the arches is spectacular. Find out more about getting there with our guide to visiting the Carsaig Arches.

8 Crofting Culture

The Ross of Mull has a strong history of crofting. You can still feel the tradition as you explore the local area to this day. Call into the Crofter’s Kitchen at Kintra to stock up on local produce, or take part in a craft workshop at Ardtun’s local willow croft. There’s also the Ross of Mull Historical Centre to explore.

Dramatic basalt columns on Staffa

9 Sailings to Staffa

As well as affording easy access to Iona, you can also sail for Staffa from Fionnphort on the Ross. In early summer, visit to meet the characterful puffins, who will be busy in their burrows raising this year’s young. All year round, boat trips to Staffa promise the magic and drama of experiencing Fingal’s Cave and the dramatic basalt columns the island is famous for.

10 Island Hopping

If visiting Iona and Staffa haven’t quite completed your island-hopping fix, then you can also visit one of Mull’s least explored outlying islands from the Ross of Mull – the Isle of Erraid. At low tide, you can walk across the tidal sandbar on Knockvologan beach to reach Erraid. But do make sure you consult the tide times! Make sure you’re back on Mull before high tide cuts Erraid off. Walk to the island’s disused lighthouse observatory or visit the sandy beach on the island’s south coast.

Inspired to visit the Ross of Mull? Book one of our cottages today and hone in on your perfect spot with our cottage map.

50 Great Things to Do on the Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull is one of the easiest islands to reach in the Hebrides, with regular ferries arriving on the island from Oban, Kilchoan and Lochaline on the Scottish mainland. It’s also one of the most exciting to explore, with mountain glens, shell-sand beaches and the vibrant town of Tobermory all to be enjoyed. We’re here to help get you started with 50 of the best things to do on the Isle of Mull. Off we go!

White tailed sea eagle flying over the loch on the Isle of Mull

Wildlife

  1. Encounter the white-tailed sea eagles
    Explore the coastline for a lucky glimpse as eagles visit their feeding grounds, or book a guided tour with a ranger at Mull Eagle Watch.
  2. Scan the shoreline for otters
    These often-elusive creatures could test your patience, but when it pays off, the chance to see otters in the wild is well worth the wait.
  3. Watch golden eagles soar over the hills
    The more mountainous parts of the island, like dramatic Glen More, are a good place to look.
  4. Look out for deer
    A regular sight, red deer outnumber people on the Isle of Mull by three to one! Fallow deer can also be found in a few parts of the island.
  5. Take a wildlife tour 
    A brilliant way to begin the week, giving you plenty of tips and places to visit during the rest of your holiday.
  6. Meet the puffins on the Treshnish Isles
    From April to July, land on Lunga to experience these ground-nesting birds close up. Boat trips depart from Tobermory and Ulva Ferry.
  7. Go whale watching off Mull’s north coast
    With the chance to see minke whales in the waters around Mull, this boat trip is a must. You could also spot basking sharks and harbour porpoise, too.
  8. Spot dolphins from a boat trip to Staffa
    It’s not uncommon for a playful pod of dolphins to accompany your boat as it sails towards Staffa and Fingal’s Cave.
  9. Look for the corncake on Iona
    There are around 40 pairs of nesting corncrake on the Isle of Iona, reached via passenger ferry from Fionnphort on Mull.
  10. Visit the aquarium
    Pay a visit to Tobermory’s catch-and-release aquarium located in the harbour building at the end of the colourful Main Street.

Dramatic cliffs and coastal walk on the Ardmeanach Peninsula, Isle of Mull

Walking

  1. Walk to Carsaig Arches
    One of the most ambitious walks on the island, cross challenging terrain to reach one of Mull’s greatest natural spectacles.
  2. Hike to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree
    A brilliant walk through true wilderness with excellent sea views to accompany you. The Tiroran holiday cottages make an excellent base for this hike.
  3. Trek from coast to coast
    Start from the old fishing boats at Salen and traverse the narrowest part of the island to reach the coast of Loch na Keal at Killiechronan.
  4. Climb Ben More
    Take the popular path from Dhiseig or tackle the more challenging A’Chioch ridge ascent.
  5. Walk to the tidal isle of Erraid
    Low tide exposes a tidal sandbar you can cross to Erraid from Knockvologan beach. Be sure to check tide times for your return journey to ensure you’re not cut off!
  6. Explore the ruined village at Shiaba
    Starting from Scoor in south west Mull, navigate the island’s coastal hilltops to reach Shiaba, with superb views out to sea.
  7. Take a guided wildlife walk
    Taking things at a slower pace can make it easier to spot Mull’s more elusive wildlife, with experienced guides to help.
  8. Climb Dun da Gaoithe
    A dramatic mountain to climb with views that stretch over the sea to the mountains of mainland Scotland.
  9. Stretch your legs at Aros Park
    Follow the crashing course of the dramatic waterfalls, take a tranquil walk around the lochan or follow the coastal path back to Tobermory.
  10. Walk to a hidden beach
    Head off the beaten track and discover the Isle of Mull’s many remarkable beaches that you can’t see from the roadside.

History & Geology

  1. Explore the Mull Museum in Tobermory
    From the island’s volcanic origins to its crofting roots, step back in time at the Mull Museum.
  2. Visit the Abbey on Iona
    A short passenger ferry crossing carries you from Fionnphort in south west Mull to the idyllic Isle of Iona.
  3. Explore the disused pink granite quarry at Fionnphort
    The pink granite rock is a distinctive feature on the Ross of Mull, with a lovely circular walk offering a glimpse at how the rock was once mined.
  4. Visit the Ross of Mull Historical Centre
    Discover the crofting traditions and challenging times of life on the Ross with exhibits, and pick up a guide book for the rest of your stay.
  5. Walk around the fossil beds at Ardtun
    A coastal walk with the chance to see columnar basalt and leaf fossils, revealing trees that once stood beside a prehistoric lake.
  6. Visit the Macquarie Mausoleum
    Take this gentle walk from Gruline to the Macquarie Mausoleum, which commemorates Sir Lachlan Macquarie who came from Ulva and became Governor of New South Wales.
  7. Walk to ruined castles at Aros and Lochbuie
    Visit the ruins on the headland at Aros, just north of Salen Bay, or follow the south coast from Lochbuie to discover Moy Castle.
  8. Visit the Iron Age fort at Aros
    While you’re in the area, head uphill to the top of Cnoc na Sroine to see the remains of the Iron Age fort.
  9. Climb up to crater loch
    Experience Mull’s volcanic past feet first with a climb to the top of the crater loch, Lochan S’Airde Beinn.
  10. Step back in time at Duart Castle
    Spot the impressive seat of Clan Maclean from the ferry into Craignure, then pay the castle a visit for a tour.

The Three Lochs virwpoint in Glen More, Isle of Mull, winter sunset

Outdoor & Adventure

  1. Go kayaking along the coast
    You can even launch your kayak from the cottage when you stay at Seaview or The Old Church.
  2. Wild swim in Calgary Bay
    Discover more wild swimming spots around the island with our guide.
  3. Visit Eas Fors waterfall
    This multi-tiered waterfall tumbles down the hillside and into the sea on the island’s west coast.
  4. Drive through the Glen More mountains
    Pull in at the Three Lochs viewpoint for an incredibly scenic picnic spot.
  5. Walk to the most north easterly point on Mull
    This less-travelled walk takes you to Ardmore Point.
  6. Visit MacKinnon’s Cave
    Remember to check the tide times and pack a torch – the cave is bigger than you think!
  7. Witness the Dakota memorial
    Walk deep into the heart of Glen Forsa and you’ll pass the memorial to the 1945 Dakota plane crash.
  8. Go mountain biking
    There’s no shortage of biking trails on the island, passing through woodland, mountain and coast.
  9. Play golf beside the sea
    There is not one but two golf courses on the Isle of Mull – a nine-hole course with views to Ardnamurchan in Tobermory, and a course in Craignure with sea views across to the Morvern hills.
  10. Go sea or river fishing
    Pick up a permit for river fishing from Tackle and Books and make your own catch of the day.
    Sweeping white sand and calm turquoise sea at Knockvologan beach on the Isle of Mull

Family

  1. Visit Rainydays soft play in Tobermory
    A great way to entertain the little ones if the weather is wild outside.
  2. Walk the Calgary Art in Nature trail
    Think of it like an artistic treasure hunt that leads down to the white sand beach.
  3. Visit the gardens at Lip na Cloiche
    Discover driftwood creations, wander through lush, jungle-like planting and enjoy the sea views from this magical garden.
  4. See a play at Mull Theatre
    Conveniently located just outside Tobermory, this makes a great addition to your holiday.
  5. Go pony trekking along the beach
    Ride through the waves and canter across the beach on surefooted Highland ponies.
  6. Make a splash in the pool
    The swimming pool at the Isle of Mull Hotel in Craignure is great for a swim whatever the weather.
  7. Experience the Tobermory Highland Games
    A day of bagpipes and competition, this traditional Highland fixture held each July is not one to be missed!
  8. Build sandcastles on Knockvologan beach
    One of the most beautiful beaches on the Isle of Mull with gorgeous sandy bays. This one is well worth a visit!
  9. Attend a country show at Salen or Bunessan
    See the Isle of Mull’s farmers and crofters turn out in their droves as their livestock compete in the show ring. Find out what’s on.
  10. Visit the shipwrecks at Salen
    One of the most iconic locations on Mull, don’t miss a visit to Salen’s old fishing boats as you venture up the east coast.

Feeling inspired to visit the Isle of Mull? Book a holiday cottage and get your holiday plans underway!

Walking Guide: MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree

It’s easy to see how the headland dubbed Mull’s wilderness peninsula earned its name. Venture out on the tidal walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree and you’ll experience the wilds first hand, for while the route is for much of the way straight forward, the views are ruggedly magnificent.

Then, upon reaching the final leg of the outwards journey, the lower level scramble over rocks along the shore and the descent of the metal ladder to get there certainly add to the challenge. One made well worth it by the spectacular waterfalls and 55 million year old fossil tree.

Ardmeaneach peninsula wilderness headland meeting the sea at Loch Scridain with steep cliffs and blue skies above

Reaching the start

The walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree begins just beyond Tiroran in south west Mull, so Gardener’s Cottage, Woodland Cottage and The Old Byre make excellent bases from which to begin the hike.

Coming from the Ross of Mull, turn left onto the ‘Scenic Route to Salen’, then a few miles on, take another left signposted to Tiroran and Burg. Continue along the lane until you reach the parking area. Coming from the north, follow the coast road along Loch na Keal heading south. Pass the Gribun cliffs and later, the Tiroran Community Forest before turning right at the signpost for Tiroran and Burg.

The walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree

The walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree follows the southern coastline of the Ardmeanach peninsula for much of the way, before rounding the headland as you approach the tree. Cast your gaze in the direction of loch Scridain, which sits at your side all the way out, and take in the beautiful Ross of Mull scenery beyond. There are eagles to watch, wildlife to spot and – if you’re very lucky – perhaps even a passing pod of dolphins.

Stone memorial cairn to Daisy Cheape on the way to MacCulloch's Fossil Tree

The route is easy going to start with, both for the navigator and for the feet. Simply follow the track towards the farm at Burg and then onwards through the woodland and the memorial to Daisy Cheape.

Waterfall cascading down lush green and rocky cliffs on Ardmeanach peninsula, Isle of Mull

Bearing north to follow the coast round the peninsula, you enter the final stage of the walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree. It’s here that the journey begins to feel more like a hike. Waterfalls punctuate the sea and wilderness views, being all the more atmospheric after a period of rain. When you reach the metal ladder, descend carefully to the rock-strewn shoreline below before reaching the fossil tree.

Close up view of basalt lava cast of MacCulloch's Fossil Tree

Spectacular rock formations and geology on the walk to MacCulloch's Fossil Tree

As you’ll be on the shore, this walk is best planned carefully with the tides to ensure you can actually reach the rocky beach below to explore. Turn away from the sea to face the cliff you just descended and take in the majesty of the fossil tree remnants, dramatically displayed within their basalt lava cast, before returning the way you came.

rocky shoreline with rock pool with large cliff towering above at Burg on Mull

The walk to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree will take the best part of the day. Prepare to enjoy some of the most staggering Isle of Mull scenery as you venture there and back.

If you plan to enjoy some of Mull’s best walks, don’t miss our guide to the hike to Carsaig Arches too.

 

 

Guide to Castle Bagging on Mull

Scotland is a land decorated with castles and on the Hebridean Isle of Mull, it’s no different. Defensive structures have long held their place here, from fortified castles keeping watch on headlands to historic, Iron Age brochs. Whether you like castles in full regalia or prefer crumbling ruins, find Isle of Mull castles that fit the bill in our guide.

Duart Castle on the headland in south east Mull, surrounded by hills and fields in autumn

Step inside Duart Castle

The most famous of Isle of Mull castles, Duart Castle is the only castle on Mull that enables you to step back in time and experience historic castle rooms. Well known as the seat of Clan Maclean, the castle dates back over 700 years. It is often photographed from the ferry, standing proud on the headland at Duart on the approach to Craignure.

The castle is open from April to October. Wander through the Great Hall, complete with beams steeped in history and antique furnishings, then peer inside the State Bedroom and Dressing Room. You’ll see period dress, family portraits and a striking four-poster bed. The Clan Exhibition completes the picture inside, with a 14th-century keep awaiting your discovery in the grounds.

Don’t forget to call into the tea room for a treat while you’re there, or head down to the beach. This is a great idea for things to do on Mull for every generation.

View to Torosay Castle surrounded by trees on the Isle of Mull

Explore the gardens at Torosay Castle

Torosay Castle is no longer open to the public, but you can visit the gardens on selected Sundays through the summer months. Keep an eye out as you pass Torosay, heading west from Craignure. A roadside sign lets you know when the gardens will be open the following Sunday.

On these days, explore the water, woodland and formal gardens. Enchanting terraces lead you through the more formal sections and there are many iconic plants of Scottish gardens to spot, as well as some more unexpected tropical varieties that enjoy Mull’s mild climate. When the gardens are closed, you can still enjoy the surrounds of Torosay by taking the walk from Craignure.

The ruins of Moy Castle poking out above the trees with a boulder strewn beach in front

Delve into the history of Moy Castle

One of the lesser known Isle of Mull castles, Moy Castle is tucked away on the picturesque coastline at Lochbuie. Park at the shore and head left, following the signs that mark the path towards Laggan Sands as you skirt the shoreline. You’ll reach the castle before the beach, so you can bear off to visit the ruins before continuing the walk.

Moy Castle stands in the trees on a small hill right beside the sea, with a burn passing close by. The dappled light through the woodland canopy combined with the sound of the water and waves creates a brilliant atmosphere. The castle itself is now in ruins, although useful information signs guide you through the history of the building and its interior.

The ruins of Moy Castle standing on the forested hill overlooking the Aros Estuary and out to Salen Bay on the Isle of Mull

Hike to the ruins of Aros Castle

Just as you spot Duart Castle from the ferry, you’ll see Aros Castle from the car. Now reduced to towering ruins, the castle occupies a hilltop overlooking the Aros estuary and sea just north of Salen. We recommend parking safely nearby and enjoying a circular walk around the castle ruins.

Not only will you get up close to this once highly important castle, you’ll also have the opportunity to spot wildlife and wildflowers in the surrounding grass and woodland. This makes the walk around Aros Castle great for historians and naturalists alike.

 

Watch wildlife around Glengorm Castle

Glengorm Castle arguably takes the crown as the most romantic of all Isle of Mull castles. So much so, in fact, that you can get married there. But it’s the turrets, towers and north coast sea views that really give this castle curb appeal.

Take in the stunning exterior of the castle, then pay a visit to the Glengorm Coffee Shop, housed in what were originally the stables. You could also join a ranger-led walk to explore the estate. Located a scenic, 15-minute drive from Tobermory, this is a great castle to visit when staying in the north of the island for lunch and leisure activities.

Discover more historical attractions on the Isle of Mull.

Which Isle of Mull castles would you like to visit?

7 Must-See Historical Attractions on the Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull is famed for many things. A charming harbour town, breathtaking beaches and abundant wildlife are only the beginning. It is also an island of great history, where much of it has been carefully preserved. Plenty of historical attractions remain on the island on display for visitors to see.

Here, we round-up seven brilliant historical attractions for you to visit on Mull. From castles to clans and old crofter’s cottages, you’ll find many memorable ways to step back in time on the island.

5 of the Best Ways to Spend Rainy Days on Mull

Whether you’ve visited Scotland and its many islands before or not, news of the nation’s frequent spells of wet weather travels fast. But while it’s also no stranger to sunshine, the Isle of Mull is an island borne of exactly such weather systems. The waterfalls, rivers and verdant, green landscapes are in part carved out and created by rainy days on Mull, so the wet conditions could even be something worth celebrating.

If you’d like to make the most of your visit, whatever the weather, then try these five ideas for damper days. With something for everyone, from families to crafters to wildlife enthusiasts, your day will be anything but a wash out.

Where To Visit On The Sound of Mull

Make the most of your journey alongside the Sound of Mull

Stretching along the Isle of Mull’s eastern shore, the Sound of Mull is the strip of water that divides the island from the west coast of mainland Britain. Visitors will cross it on either the Oban or Lochaline CalMac ferry. Naturally, many set straight off for their accommodation around the island, but there are lots of places to visit along the Sound on the way, and plenty lying within too! So take a bit of time to explore the Sound of Mull and all of its interesting sights en route with this guide.

Summer view over Grasspoint on the Sound of Mull

Looking over Grasspoint at the southern end of the Sound of Mull

Top 10 Things to do with Children on the Isle of Mull

The outdoors is certainly one of the Isle of Mull’s greatest attractions.  With miles of unspoilt coastline and stunning views around every corner, you’re never short of things to see.  So if you are in the midst of planning your next family holiday and are thinking about days out and activities to do with the kids, you might find this list of our top 10 things to do with children on the Isle of Mull a helpful starting point.  We’ve put together this little list to help entertain your little ones no matter what the weather.

 

1.Explore life from the seas around Mull at the Isle of Mull Aquarium

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

The Isle of Mull Aquarium in Tobermory

Located in Tobermory, the Mull Aquarium is a ‘catch and release’ Aquarium.  This means the species on display are ‘resident’ for a maximum of four weeks before being returned to the water.  As a result there is always something new to see on each visit.  Kids will love the interactive touch pool sessions. There are a good selection of toys and souvenirs too, not to mention the mesmerising contour sand pit!  Contact 01688 302 876

2. Mull Pony Trekking

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Kids will love seeing Mull from the saddle!

Catering to both experienced and first time riders, Mull Pony Trekking offers a superb opportunity for kids to gain experience with the ponies whilst seeing some of Mull’s finest scenery.  Taster sessions can also be booked, ideal for the very youngest riders and those who are a bit unsure.  Perfect for toddlers are the shetland pony rides. After a quick brush and pat you can lead your children out on a short ride.  The more experienced riders will love cantering along the shore on the beach trek.  Contact Liz: 07748807447

 

3. Rainydays indoor soft play and cafe

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Located within Aros Hall on Tobermory’s Main Street, Rainydays soft play will let children burn off that excess energy no matter what the weather!  There are a range of ‘climbing blocks’, slides and a ball pit.  Drinks and snacks can also be purchased and there are a selection of books and magazines too.  Contact:  rainydaysaroshall@gmail.com

 

4. Visit Duart Castle and Tearoom

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Duart Castle on the Isle of Mull as viewed from across the bay

Kids will love a visit to Mull’s Duart castle.  The castle is the seat of clan MacLean and dates back to the 13th century.  You explore the inside of Duart, where there are exhibits and displays detailing the castle’s history.   Steps lead right up to the roof terrace, where the are outstanding views.  After looking around the castle you can enjoy a sit down and some delicious food and drinks in the tearoom.  Walking trails lead around Duart point.  There is a millennium woodland walk and even a small sandy beach to find!  Duart Castle also hosts a range of events and attractions that take place throughout the summer.  Contact: 01680 812 309

 

5. Explore the stunning gardens at Lip na Cloiche

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Paths weave through the stunning gardens at Lip na Cloiche

Situated on the Isle of Mull’s west coast, Lip na Cloiche gardens will be a firm favourite with children and adults alike.  Entry is by donation and a maze of footpaths let you explore this stunning hillside garden.  The gardens are densely planted with a wide range of plants that thrive in the warm sea air.  The gardens feature a mix of beach-combed and ‘found’ items that are beautifully incorporated into the planting in a way that will surprise and engage children and adults too.  You can also purchase craft items and plants and a proportion of the proceeds are donated back to local charities.  Contact: 01688 500 257

 

6. Take a family friendly walk

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Aros Park is perfect for a family walk

Walks on the Isle of Mull for kids don’t have to involve climbing Ben More, the island’s Munro. You can see some great views at lower levels and with little effort.  Aros Park is a great option for walking with children on Mull. Located just south of Tobermory, Aros Park has a network of maintained tracks, including some that are suitable for pushchairs too.  In sunny weather children will enjoy ball games on the grass where there is also a climbing frame and picnic areas.  In heavy rain the park is stunning with its many impressive waterfalls that thunder into the sea of Tobermory harbour.  There are trails into the woods with adventure courses to complete and stunning views over the harbour to Tobermory.  See details and maps on our walking page.

 

7. Make waves at the Isle of Mull Swimming Pool

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Kids enjoying the Mull swimming pool

The Isle of Mull Swimming Pool is centrally located in Craignure at the Isle of Mull Hotel.  This 17m long pool is great for children because the depth is 1.2m. There is a shallower toddler/learner pool too.  Adults can also enjoy use of the spa, which has a sauna, steam room and outdoor Jacuzzi.  A range of beauty treatments are available and there is a Rasul Mud room.  After everyone has enjoyed the pool you can head over for a bite to eat in the hotel lounge bar.

 

8. Discover the Isle of Mull’s past at The Old Byre

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

The Old Byre heritage centre near Dervaig, Mull

The Old Byre heritage centre is located just outside of Dervaig in north Mull.  Children can play in the covered play area, which has a selection of toys and games.  There are picnic benches where you can enjoy food and drinks from the cafe.  The heritage centre has a excellent display of models that show life like scenes from Mull’s past.  There are also informative films you can watch and a gift shop too.  Contact: 01688 400 229

 

9. Hit the beach for sandcastles and paddling!

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Kids playing on the beach at Calgary on Mull

A trip to a beach is also a good bet and Mull has some of the finest beaches you could wish for.  Whether it’s picnics or sandcastle building, paddling or fishing, children always seem to have a way of making their own fun and games given an expanse of sand to do it on!  Mull has such a beautiful range of beaches and coastline to enjoy with sands of every colour.  Kick start your next beach day with our guide to beaches on the Isle of Mull.

 

10. Become an island explorer and take a boat trip!

Plan a family holiday to the Isle of Mull and your children are guaranteed a great adventure, from swimming to beaches, aquariums, castles and more...

Staffa and basalt columns

Mull offers some amazing boat trips exploring the waters and small islands around its coast.  The trip to Staffa is an ideal short trip to do with children.  The sail takes around 40 minutes from Mull and you have a chance of see wildlife along the way.  Landing on Staffa you get an hour ashore to explore the island on foot (taking care!).  You can guide kids around to the impressive Fingal’s cave, and watch waves crash inside making a tremendous noise!  In spring and summer, puffins arrive on Staffa and young children will enjoy watching these colourful birds.  This is an ideal first boat trip, being shorter in length but big in drama!  See more about Staffa and a list of Mull boat trip operators to contact.

 

These are just a sample of some things to do with kids on the Isle of Mull but you’ll find plenty more.  You’ll also see we have a brilliant range of holiday cottages that our great for families.  See our full range at Isle of Mull Cottages and do get in touch if you’d like any help or advice: 01688 400 682 or mail@isleofmullcottages.com

 

What are your favourite activities to do with your children on Mull?