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Holiday Ideas on Mull Archive

Where to Taste the Island’s Seafood

Surrounded by crystal-clear water on all sides and with 300 miles of coastline, it’s little wonder the Isle of Mull is a superb seafood destination. So, whether you’d like to cook up a storm in your cottage or sample the finest fare out and about, read on to find out how you can savour the island’s freshest catches during your stay.

Tobermory, the island’s capital, is home to a fleet of fishing boats

Where to buy seafood on Mull

For guests staying in Tobermory, then the Tobermory Fish Company is the place to go. Located at Baliscate, just on the edge of town, you’ll find a tempting array of smoked fish and seafood favourites, as well as some incredibly delicious seafood platters. Conveniently, they also have a great range of oat cakes and accompaniments to enjoy the full flavour experience.

Further afield in North Mull, the beautiful drive out to Croig, just past the village of Dervaig, will reward visitors with a lovely surprise: an honesty box selling oysters in season!

A similar set-up can be found in the south of the island too, with mussels available on an honesty box basis at Inverlussa – ideal for guests heading onwards to cottages on the Ross of Mull to stock up on the way. Served with a wild garlic and white wine sauce is a favourite among locals.

The quiet Ross of Mull is home to many fishing boats who still sail the waters in search of the finest catches. Slow down and enjoy a chat with the locals by the pier in Fionnphort, who’ll often be able to tell you when the next catch will be brought ashore, if you can resist the temptation of the seafood sizzling away beside you at the Creel Seafood Bar.

You can also take a look at the Mull and Iona Food Trail to find more local producers to try.

The pier at Croig, where oysters can be purchased in season

The best seafood restaurants on Mull

Cafe Fish in Tobermory

Tucked at the top of the ferry building at the end of Tobermory’s harbourfront, Cafe Fish comes with oodles of character. Think driftwood beams above every window wrapped in fairy lights and a lovely, intimate atmosphere. And then there’s the menu, which is deservedly popular and means you’ll need to make your reservation well in advance.

The Mishdish in Tobermory

Enjoy dinner in one of Tobermory’s most iconic buildings at the Mishdish. This seafood restaurant has a whole host of treats to tempt you, from scallops and oysters to langoustines and mussels. And for those less keen in the party, there are some excellent steak dishes to try, too.

Am Birlinn in Penmore

Housed in a beautiful timber building in the shape of a boat, Am Birlinn is a superb place to sample Isle of Mull seafood. The entire menu has a distinctively local flair, with the furthest sourced produce coming from Inverlussa on the island’s south coast. The beginning of the menu showcases the provenance of the restaurant’s ingredients, which they artfully transform into decadent seafood stews, luxurious lobster dishes and more. A firm favourite for locals and visitors alike.

Ninth Wave in Fionnphort

Venture down to the more remote Ross of Mull and yet more opportunities arise to enjoy Isle of Mull seafood. For a special occasion, there can be no finer choice than the Ninth Wave. Located on a croft, this husband and wife team take pride in showcasing the best of Scottish produce on their dynamic tasting menu, favouring fish caught locally and sustainably and seasonal ingredients picked fresh from the garden.

A Dog Friendly Day Out on the Isle of Mull

As the ferry sails into Craignure from the west coast town of Oban, it’s time for your adventure on the island to begin! Just across from the pier, you’ll find the lovely little café Blethers. The perfect spot to warm up with a steaming mug of coffee, often with treats for your dog too! They’re also known for an excellent fish and chip supper, should your ferry happen to coincide with lunchtime…

A winter walk onto the hills on Mull

Dog friendly day out on the Ross of Mull

Rested and refuelled, it’s time to hit the road and enjoy a taste of what Mull has to offer! For those staying on the Ross of Mull, then a stop at Ardura Community Woodland on the way to your dog friendly cottage is a must. From the parking area just off the Glen More road, a quiet track ambles along the meandering River Lussa deep into the glen, with wonderful views to Mull’s mountains through the oak woodland, as well as a memorial to John Jones, beside Pedlars Pool.

Follow the course of the River Lussa along the path through the Ardura Community Forest

Returning to the car, there are yet more views to soak up as you pass through the glen with steep hills rising to either side. As you drop down towards Pennyghael and Loch Scridain opens up before you, Ben More will tower to your right, and you find yourselves on the Ross.

Let your four-legged-friends stretch their legs on Ardalanish beach

If time allows, continue on before heading to your dog friendly holiday cottage and sample your first of many beautiful beaches. The fine sands of Uisken and Ardalanish will all be wonderful sights to start your holiday. Or, for those who venture as far as Fidden, there’s a taste of more to come with the outlying islands of Iona and Erraid in view too, both of which make excellent dog friendly days out during your holiday on Mull, with stunning scenic walks and coastline.

Refreshed by the sea breeze and salty air, wipe off those muddy paws and sink into the warm welcome of your dog friendly holiday cottage. A call before your arrival to the Lochbuie Larder comes highly recommended, meaning you can tuck into locally sourced, homemade ready meals for your first night on the island. The Argyll Arms pub in Bunessan will also be a welcome visit during your stay, where your four-legged-friends will feel at home too.

Exploring Traigh na Cille beach in north west Mull

Dog friendly day out in North Mull

For those staying in the island’s north, enjoy the scenic drive up along the edge of Salen Bay, stopping to see the iconic shipwrecks and the seals so often on the skerries. Just before the stone bridge with a left hand turn to Dervaig, make time for the first of many walks on the island as you follow the lane along the Aros river estuary to the ruins of the 16th century Aros Castle. This makes a great short walk with lots of birdlife to see to stretch your legs after the ferry.

One of several dog friendly walks around Aros Park, near Tobermory, which follows the shore of the lochan

Back in the car, continue up the east coast with great views of the Sound of Mull as you go. Then, as you near Tobermory, make a right turn and follow the rhododendron-lined driveway down to Aros Park. Here, a dog friendly wonderland of trails awaits, following the course of waterfalls, circuiting the lochan or hugging the coast all the way to Tobermory’s harbourfront. Pick any one of them or try them all – they’re sure to be a favourite with four-legged-friends.

Enjoy dinner in one of several pet friendly pubs on Tobermory’s harbourfront

As you arrive at your dog friendly holiday cottage on Mull, it’s time to pull off your boots, wipe off their paws and settle in for a relaxing stay. And if you fancy a night off cooking, you’re in luck, as many of North Mull’s cafes and restaurants are dog friendly. They’ll be all too happy to curl up beside the fire in the Mishnish pub, or to join you for dinner at MacGochans at the end of the harbour.

Book your pet friendly cottage for a holiday on Mull.

Cottages for Adventure Seekers

In the past 12 months, we’ve become better than ever at exploring the great outdoors that lies on our doorstep. As part of that, many of us have found new passions for outdoor pursuits, whether taking on testing hills or taking to the water for a bracing wild swim. With that in mind, we’ve compiled our pick of the best Mull cottages for adventure seekers, whatever pursuit most appeals to you…

The garden gate at Sands Cottage in Calgary

Cottages for wild swimming

Calgary’s sheltered horseshoe bay and glistening clear waters make a tempting case for braving the bracing temperatures and taking a wild swim. Where better to base yourselves, then, than Sands Cottage and Calgary Bay Cottage, where you can dash back up the beach and straight in the door to warm beside the fire afterwards. Bliss!

Derryguaig Smiddy’s fantastic location on the slopes towards Ben More

Cottages for hill walking

Tucked into the foothills of Ben More, Derryguaig Smiddy offers a prime position for those hoping to summit Mull’s only munro during their stay. There are plenty more interesting hills to tackle in the area too, from the challenging Ben Fhada to the difficult alternative ascent of Ben More via the A’Chioch Ridge.

Venturing south, Dobhran Croft promises some excellent hills close by too at Lochbuie. Ben Buie is, of course, a must. But with the remote and dramatic coastline towards both Laggan and Carsaig, and the hills of Craig Ben to discover, there’s plenty to entertain those who like to head off the beaten track.

Direct access to the shore from the garden at The Old Church

Cottages for kayaking

With Loch Scridain at the bottom of the garden, The Old Church has long been popular with guests hoping to enjoy Mull from the water during their stay. Launch your kayak from the rocky shoreline and get a new perspective of the beauties of the Ross of Mull coastline.

View to Salen Bay from the balcony at Scots Cottage

Cottages for paddle boarding

With the tranquil waters of Salen Bay (and, conveniently, paddle board hire available in the village too), Scots Cottage is the perfect choice for those who wish to dip their toes in the adventurous side of Mull, all with a welcoming and modern homestay to return to.

The River Ba and surrounding hills of Mull’s mountainous interior

Cottages for biking

Some of Mull’s most dramatic scenery and terrain lies deep in the heart of the island in a little-visited area called Glen Cannel. To get here, one must venture along the length of Loch Ba and then deep into the glen, surrounded by Mull’s mountain country on all sides. A fantastic cycle in wild surrounds, with a good chance of being joined by a soaring eagle or quartering hen harrier as you go. Macquarie House affords easy access to this wonderful part of Mull.

Geocaching on Mull: Five to Find

Think of it as a treasure hunt that every generation can enjoy. Geoacaching on Mull is a great way to find inspiration for walks to try, as you set off on new routes with a mission in mind: finding the cache! It might be hidden beneath a rock, tucked inside a tree stump or wedged within an old stone wall, or it may be stowed somewhere else entirely!

Geocaching on Mull will cultivate your curiosity as you explore new corners of the island that you might not have visited before. So, how can you get involved and where should you begin?

First, you’ll need to prepare your treasure hunting tools – that means having a GPS device, or a geocaching app downloaded to your phone to guide you once out hunting. You can also join geocaching.com, which is a great place to find cache coordinates and record your progress as you go.

Here are some of our favourite geocaching sites to discover on Mull:

Treshnish whisky cave

1 The whisky cave at Treshnish

One of Mull’s best walks in its own right, you’ll pass through wildflower meadows and along dramatic coastline where the Treshnish Isles appear impossibly close. If you can tear your eyes away from the stunning scenery, then there are a number of caches to search for here, including in the whisky cave.

Standing stones at Glengorm

2 The standing stones at Glengorm

After setting your coordinates and sussing out the location of this cache, it’s only a short walk through stunning coastal scenery, with great views of Glengorm Castle and often passing Highland coos, to reach the wonderful café at Glengorm. Don’t miss the hearty soups, delicious burgers made with Glengorm beef and the mouth-watering array of cakes.

Woodland walk in Salen

3 Salen Woods

A lovely circular walk that’s popular with locals climbs up through woodland, where at the high point fantastic views open up across to the Sound of Mull. Add a sense of adventure to this well-trodden footpath by finding the coordinates that conceal the cache.

Eas-Fors-waterfall
Guest image by Ben Ferguson – please take care around the waterfall and keep well back from the edge!

4 Eas Fors

Over on the island’s remote west coast, Eas Fors waterfall cascades down the hillside before plunging into the sea loch below. A stunning view to enjoy as you search for the cache located in the surrounding area close by. If you choose to venture close to the waterfall, please take great care around the slippery rocks and keep well clear of the drops and away from the edge.

Rubh nan Gall Tobermory lighthouse

5 Rubh nan Gall Lighthouse

A wonderful there-and-back walk from the harbourfront in Tobermory, begin at the far end of the Main Street by the CalMac pier. Follow the footpath through coastal woodland to reach the beautiful lighthouse. There’s a lovely picnic bench and viewpoint along this path that makes a great place for a picnic after finding the cache.

As with all walks on Mull, be sure to choose routes that suit your ability and head out prepared. We hope we’ve inspired you to try geocaching on Mull and discover more of the island on foot.

Fishing on Mull: 5 Expert Tips Plus Where to Stay

Fishing on Mull has long been a draw for visitors to the island. It’s a traditional way of life that has deep island roots, with many of the oldest buildings in Tobermory linked to fishing and the associated commerce that Tobermory’s sheltered harbour facilitated. Visit the harbourfront today and you’ll still find the fisherman’s pier busy with boats as catches are unloaded.

But of course, fishing on Mull isn’t limited to what you can find at sea. The island has some fine river and loch fishing to enjoy too. Guy Bolton is a local expert, providing a guiding service for keen anglers visiting Mull, and in this article he shares five top tips to enjoy the bounty Mull has to offer.

Expert tips for fishing on Mull

1. Dress for the occasion

Make sure you have the right foot wear and clothing for a days’ fishing on Mull, the weather here is very changeable and making sure you are kitted out for the day helps to ensure that you stay warm and dry and you are far more likely then to enjoy your day out.

2. Movement is key

Once you have chose a loch or river to fish, try not to get stuck in the same spot all the day. Move around, up and down the bank in different directions. Trout can be quite nomadic, moving around the loch looking for their next meal. It can be easy to spook them in these remote hill lochs, so stealth and keeping trying different places can help hugely.

3. Flies and lures

Keep changing them don’t thrash away for hours if the fly or lure isn’t working. Keep trying different things with the hope that you will present the fish with something it simply can’t resist.

4. Safe hands

When handling fish you have caught look after them, especially if you are intending returning them to the water. Try to keep them as wet as possible. If the slimy coating of the fish gets damaged or rubbed off too much, it leaves the fish susceptible to infection and disease.

5. Plan ahead

Let people know where you are thinking of going and give them a vague idea of when you are expecting to return home. This way if anything were to happen to you or someone in your party, for example a fall, then help will never be too far away.

Best cottages for fishing on Mull

Armed with the expert advice of Guy Bolton, you’ll soon be on your way to fishing success. And you can even enjoy it from the luxury of your own cottage, with these three perfect properties for fishing on Mull.

The Steading (sleeps 4) on Loch Assapol

The Steading, Loch Assapol

Venture straight to the loch shore from the front door of The Steading and enjoy some fine freshwater loch fishing on Loch Assapol. Then it’s only a short walk home with your catch to cook up a storm in the beautiful dining kitchen, complete with vaulted ceilings and charming beams. A great choice for all the family, with excellent walking, beautiful beaches and abundant wildlife in the area too.

Craig Ben Lodge (sleeps 10, pet friendly) on Loch Uisg

Craig Ben Lodge, Loch Uisg

Treat yourselves to a true Highland escape with a stay at Craig Ben Lodge, complete with a turret and exceptional loch views. The house affords easy access to the sea at Lochbuie and Loch Spelve, with use of a boat available on Loch Uisg too.

Macquarie House (sleeps 9-10, pet friendly) on Loch Ba

Macquarie House, Loch Ba

A stone’s throw from the dramatic freshwater loch, Loch Ba, which leads into Mull’s mountainous interior, Macquarie House is an angler’s delight, with a boat available to hire, permits available for river fishing on the River Ba, and even the chance to catch brown trout on a hill loch nearby. Throw in the close proximity of Loch na Keal for sea fishing, and a week simply won’t feel long enough.

Discover more inspiration for things to do on Mull and make your holiday truly memorable.

Pony Trekking on the Isle of Mull with Traditional Highland Ponies

The Isle of Mull is famous for its wildlife, but it’s also well regarded for its livestock too. From the Highland cows who so often cause a traffic jam on the Torloisk hill road, to the sheep spotted on the beach, there’s plenty to encounter. The range of breeds raised here can be seen and celebrated each summer too, at the Salen and Bunessan shows. Perhaps one of the most special of all are the Highland ponies that call Killiechronan home.

pony trekking along the beach Isle of Mull

Here, on the island’s west coast, you can hop into the saddle of the Scottish Highlands and Islands’ traditional native breed and enjoy a ride on the beach or head up into the hills and along forest trails with Mull Pony Trekking. You might even have a close encounter with the island’s famous white-tailed sea eagles, who are undisturbed by the ponies’ presence.

pony trekking on beach by Ben More and other hills on Mull

A gentle amble on the lead rein with marvellous views over Loch na Keal and Ben More, or a fast-paced blast through the surf, pony trekking on the Isle of Mull is tailored to your ability. UK native breeds are the order of the day at Mull Pony Trekking, with Highland ponies, some homebred, joined by Shetlands and even a Fell pony too.

Pony in field Isle of Mull

Highland ponies have long called the islands home. They were a popular choice with crofters thanks to their stocky build, sure-footedness and great strength. This made them very versatile for tasks on the farm, and even in some cases for logging. The estates also have a long history with the breed, as they make excellent deer ponies to bring animals off the hill after a day’s sporting pursuits. There are still a few working deer ponies on the island to this day.

Whether you are new to horses or a keen rider, an experience with Mull Pony Trekking is not to be missed.

Discover the Island’s Artisans

Perhaps best known for our abundant wildlife, white sand beaches and buzzy town of Tobermory, there are also many creatives and artists on Mull. Based throughout the island, many work in home studios and workshops, but there are opportunities to see them under one roof too.

Here’s the lowdown to give you food for thought and inspiration for places to visit and keepsakes to take home from artists on Mull.

Beachcombed artwork by Lip na Cloiche, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

Market Treasures

Not limited to locally raised produce, seafood and meat (although these make delicious purchases too), the Tobermory Producer’s Market is also home to a rotation of different artisan makers. Purchase hand-woven tartans here in Tobermory, as well as paintings and artworks, fabrics and gifts and even woodwork from exhibiting makers.

Baile Mor Books, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

Glorious Galleries

Mull certainly holds its own in the Hebrides when it comes to artists and galleries, and there are a number you can visit during your stay. Find several galleries as you work your way down from Breadalbane Street, calling into An Tobar, and then down to the harbourfront in Tobermory, or hit the road and visit the Tin Shed Gallery on the west coast. There’s even a gallery on Iona!

Jewellery by Drift Designs, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

The Mull and Iona Shop

Another way to get your fix of Hebridean treasures is to pay a virtual visit to the Mull and Iona Shop. Formed in August 2020, the Mull and Iona Shop showcases the unique arts, crafts and local produce out islands have to offer, bringing it all together online and allowing you to shop it all from one website. Most products are handmade by small local artists and are a brilliant way to send a piece of the island to you, wherever you are.

Find more things to do when you visit Mull here.

Outdoor Activities on Mull to Enjoy in Winter

Winter on a Hebridean island brings many things to mind – dramatic tides rolling onto exposed beaches, cosy nights beside the wood burning stove and wrapping up warm to watch for the Northern Lights. Whether your stay is filled with crisp winter sunshine or atmospheric seasonal storms, here are a few outdoor activities on Mull to enjoy in the quiet winter months.

northern lights over mull

1 Enjoy Stargazing

The long dark nights that cloak the Hebrides during the winter months offer a superb opportunity for budding astronomers and stargazers alike. Head out on a clear night and see what you can spot.

For the luckiest, cast your gaze northwards and you may even see the dancing colours of the Northern Lights, which are spotted here throughout the winter months when the solar energy is right. Find out more about stargazing on Mull.

2 Fossil Hunting

Not to collect and take home, but certainly to marvel at. On a bright, calm day, there are two paths to pick from.

For the adventurous, the dramatic route from Tiroran to the Fossil Tree (it’s known as the wilderness peninsula for a reason!) at low tide will take your breath away.

For an easier going amble, the circular walk at Ardtun on the Ross of Mull enables you to enjoy the stunning coastal scenery as you scout out fossil leaf beds, which once stood beside a prehistoric lake!

Silhouette of a red deer stag roaring at sunset on the Isle of Mull

3 Watch for Wildlife

During the winter months, the red deer descend from their home ranges in the hills and are often seen at lower levels, making winter an ideal time to see them up close.

Much of the island’s wildlife remains with us through the winter – the eagles, otters, seals and more call Mull home year-round. And then there are the seasonal visitors, for whom winter signals their season of return – keep an eye out for the rare Great Northern Diver among others.

4 Go Fishing

At this time of year, fisherman’s huts come in especially handy to shelter from the weather if needed. Tackle and Books in Tobermory are the people to ask to secure your permits to fish, with the Mishnish Lochs a pretty spot with shelter if you need it, or the Aros Park lochan, where you can take cover beneath the trees.

Duart Castle standing proudly on an outcrop in south east Mull, seen from the ferry as it approaches Craignure

5 Bag Castles

Make your first Duart Castle – while it closes its doors to visitors over the winter months, you’ll enjoy magnificent views of the castle as you approach Mull on the Oban to Craignure ferry.

From here, several beautiful castles await, some ornate and privately owned, like Glengorm, which can be seen from a distance on the walk to the Bathing Pools, or Torosay Castle, which peeks through the trees on a coastal walk from Craignure.

Others act as relics of the past, like the 16th century Aros Castle, where ruins remain statuesque on the hilltop beside Salen Bay and the Aros estuary. Moy Castle, visited by a beautiful coastal path from Lochbuie, is another castle majestic in its age and well worth the walk to.

6 Step Back in Time

Follow coastal paths to ruined villages that serve as a poignant reminder of the Highland Clearances island-wide. From the Ross of Mull, the path to Shiaba is a stunning, windswept coastal walk with pretty beaches to pass by.

Further north, walk the Treshnish Headland for more spectacular sea views, passing the ruined village of Crackaig as you go. From Tobermory, the walk to Ardmore Point is only a few minutes’ drive, where again, ruined cottages pay testament to times past.

Feeling inspired by these winter activities on Mull? Visit the island at its quietest and enjoy an excellent value winter break – choose from one of our cosy cottages available this winter.

10 Reasons to Visit the Ross of Mull

Whether you’ve booked a cottage in the island’s wild south west or are planning a day trip from Tobermory, discover 10 reasons to explore the Ross of Mull. From beaches to island hopping, wildlife to rocks, there’s plenty to inspire your next holiday on Mull.

Fidden beach on the Ross of Mull

1 Breath-taking Beaches

From Knockvologan’s sheltered coves, dotted with pink granite outcrops, to the glittering seascapes of Uisken and Ardalanish with views to outlying islands, to little known sandy beaches flanked by hills and reached by the adventurous – the Ross of Mull has it all. There are beaches you can park beside and beaches well off the beaten track. There’s even a beach rumoured to be a favourite among the Royals! Choose your favourites to visit with our guide to beaches on the Ross of Mull.

2 Isle of Iona

No where on Mull is it easier to experience the charming island of Iona, than from a cottage on the Ross of Mull. Whether you pick Pennyghael, Ardtun or even Loch Assapol as your location for the week, the short ferry crossing from Fionnphort to Iona is within easy reach. Iona makes an excellent day trip with a visit to the Abbey, a walk to hear the corncrakes in season, or a stroll to the beautiful Bay at the Back of the Ocean.

Sea eagle dives for fish

3 Wonderful Wildlife

Mull is well known as a wildlife capital and the Ross of Mull is no different. Spend some time exploring loch and land with the chance to encounter otters, white tailed sea eagles, golden eagles, red deer and seals. If you’re particularly lucky, you may even spot dolphins or a porpoise passing through the sea lochs, or escorting a local fishing boat back to shore. There are even cottages where you can watch wildlife from the window, with hen harriers often sighted from Keills Cottage.

4 Locally Landed Seafood

The Ross of Mull forms a narrow peninsula, bordered by sea on both sides. The proximity to the coast means seafood is often top of the menu. Enjoy the locally landed catch in a laid-back setting at the Creel Seafood Bar beside the ferry slipway in Fionnphort, or for fine dining, book a table at Ninth Wave.

Mull’s wilderness peninsula with a waterfall in reverse during high winds

5 Wilderness Peninsula

The beautiful waters of Loch Scridain carve their way along the north side of the Ross. Across the water, the dramatic Ardmeanach peninsula comes into view. This wildly beautiful area is easily reached by taking the road signposted the ‘Scenic Route to Salen’, then bearing off beside Kilfinichen Bay, following singposts for Tiroran and the Burg. From the designated parking area, there are dramatic landscapes to explore, with a day-long hike leading you to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree.

6 Great Geology

This part of Mull has a distinctly different geological makeup to much of the island. Pink granite rocks stand out in the landscape and glow beautifully come sunset. The beaches at Knockvologan and Fidden offer great examples, as does the walk past the disused quarry at Fionnphort. Further along the Ross, you can also explore the shoreline at Ardtun to encounter striking fossil leaf beds.

Carsaig Arches - a challenging walk on the south coast

7 Carsaig Arches

The amazing geology doesn’t stop there, because at Carsaig, arguably one of Mull’s most magnificent natural features awaits – the Carsaig Arches. Reached by a dramatic and nerve-tingling walk along challenging coastline, the route will test your bravery at times, but the reward when you reach the arches is spectacular. Find out more about getting there with our guide to visiting the Carsaig Arches.

8 Crofting Culture

The Ross of Mull has a strong history of crofting. You can still feel the tradition as you explore the local area to this day. Call into the Crofter’s Kitchen at Kintra to stock up on local produce, or take part in a craft workshop at Ardtun’s local willow croft. There’s also the Ross of Mull Historical Centre to explore.

Dramatic basalt columns on Staffa

9 Sailings to Staffa

As well as affording easy access to Iona, you can also sail for Staffa from Fionnphort on the Ross. In early summer, visit to meet the characterful puffins, who will be busy in their burrows raising this year’s young. All year round, boat trips to Staffa promise the magic and drama of experiencing Fingal’s Cave and the dramatic basalt columns the island is famous for.

10 Island Hopping

If visiting Iona and Staffa haven’t quite completed your island-hopping fix, then you can also visit one of Mull’s least explored outlying islands from the Ross of Mull – the Isle of Erraid. At low tide, you can walk across the tidal sandbar on Knockvologan beach to reach Erraid. But do make sure you consult the tide times! Make sure you’re back on Mull before high tide cuts Erraid off. Walk to the island’s disused lighthouse observatory or visit the sandy beach on the island’s south coast.

Inspired to visit the Ross of Mull? Book one of our cottages today and hone in on your perfect spot with our cottage map.

5 of Mull’s Most Spectacular Walks

We’ve all had a little more time than usual to explore the local landscapes lately. It’s been no different here on the Isle of Mull, with many of us heading out to enjoy the coastline, woodlands and glens on our doorsteps. Here, we hope to inspire you to explore the island on foot with some of the best walks on the Isle of Mull.

Choose from these five of our favourites to get you started, from hill walks to wildflower meadows and geological wonders.

1 Summit Ben More

Of course, no guide to the best walks on the Isle of Mull would be complete without a nod to the island’s only munro. Ben More makes a fantastic peak to climb starting from the shore of Loch na Keal at Dhiseig.

In fine weather, enjoy clear skies and fantastic views over Mull’s mountainous interior from the top, as well as excellent panoramas across to Iona, Staffa and the Treshnish Isles as you descend. For a more challenging climb, ascend via Beinn Fada.

Second arch at Carsaig Arches, a challenging hike on Mull

2 Marvel at the Carsaig Arches

One of Mull’s most photographed features by intrepid walkers, the path to the Carsaig Arches is not for the faint hearted, but promises a breath-taking natural spectacle at the end.

It’s best done in fine weather as you hug the exposed, rocky coastline on the there and back route. You may find sure-footed wild goats and red deer keep you company!

Best walks on the Isle of Mull - Treshnish headland

3 Walk among the wildflowers

If you’re staying in a cottage in the north of the island, make a point of planning the Treshnish Point circular walk during your stay. Parking on the west coast of the island, this track leads you around the coastline past pebble beaches, the whisky cave and ruined village of Craickag.

There’s a chance to spot cetaceans off the coast, but what makes this walk most remarkable is the stunning display of wildflowers in early summer.

4 Trek to the Fossil Tree

Keen walkers will relish the opportunity to explore the remote and wild Burg peninsula in the south west of the island.

Parking in the designated area at Tiroran, head out for an all-day hike and experience some of Mull’s most remarkable coastal landscapes and wildlife, as well as the remains of a historic dun.

Consider the tides before setting out to ensure you’ll be able to descend to the Fossil Tree, before retracing your steps.

Best walks on the Isle of Mull - three lochs

5 Venture beyond the Three Lochs

The Three Lochs are a regular pausing point for those enjoying the stunning drive through Glen More, but few venture further than the viewpoint. However, the surrounds of this chain of lochs offer excellent walking opportunities.

Enjoy a low level amble around the lochs themselves, keeping your eye out for hen harriers and short eared owls quartering the grassland. For hill walkers, the climb up Ben Fhada, with the optional addition of Creach Beinn, will offer plenty of interest. Although not always a path well trodden, this is undoubtedly one of the best walks on the Isle of Mull with stunning scenery on both routes.

Discover more fantastic walks on Mull in our extensive guide.