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Wildlife Boat Trips from the Isle of Mull

It’s been an amazing summer for wildlife boat trips from the Isle of Mull, with regular appearances of dolphins in their droves, sightings of minke whales and harbour porpoise, and even in the last few weeks views of John Coe and Aquarius, members of the west coast population of killer whales!

Here, we catch up with Colin from Turus Mara to get the inside scoop:

Dolphin leaping off the Isle of Mull

Dolphins

It has been a really great summer for wildlife out on Staffa and the Treshnish Isles and surrounds, particularly for common dolphins with weeks of virtually daily sightings. ‘Dolphin soup’ has been the somewhat unpalatable epithet in use due to the sheer numbers of ‘Delphinus delphis’ in our plying area!

If the dolphins are feeding or otherwise engaged we just sit back and watch them going about their business – but often they choose to come to us – to play on the bow or just to spin around the boat clicking and whistling to the delight of our passengers.

Minke whales

It is rarer that a minke whale will come and associate with the boat – and these occasions can be intimate and almost emotional. One day this year all our passengers except a mother and son had gone ashore. We took the two ‘stayaboards’ to watch a juvenile minke nearby and it decided we required to be closely inspected.

We were stopped in the water and the young whale swam round and round the boat, also making several passes underneath, clearly visible in the calm water – even turning on its side to check us out. It really is incredible to look directly in the eye of a minke whale; a connection that few ever have the chance to feel – a privilege really.

Seal on off shore skerrie Isle of Mull

Staffa and the Treshnish Isles

September and October is a great time for a boat trip to Staffa and Fingal’s Cave, avoiding the busier months of summer.

The Treshnish Isles also have plenty to offer, with an influx of huge numbers of Atlantic Grey Seals. Over 1200 pups are born around the coast each year.

Our vessels depart from Ulva Ferry on the west side of Mull where there is ample parking. All our tours take place in the Loch na Keal National Scenic Area, with views of Ben More, Mull’s only munro (a mountain over three thousand feet), the cliffs of Gribun and Ardmeanach.

Wildlife boat trip from the Isle of Mull
Outlying island off the Isle of Mull with puffins

Wildlife boat trips from the Isle of Mull

Turus Mara boat trips cruise by Ulva, Gometra, Little Colonsay and Inch Kenneth – all islands with differing topography and fascinating stories in their own right. We endeavour to engage, educate and inform on topics as diverse as geology, history, nature and culture, all part of the magic of wildlife boat trips from the Isle of Mull.

Discover more about the island’s amazing wildlife, about our fascinating outlying islands, and the adventures you can enjoy when you stay with us.

Kayaking and Paddle Boarding on the Isle of Mull

Kayaking and paddle boarding on the Isle of Mull have become ever more popular as visitors look to soak up the scenery and sea surrounding the island.

Kayaking with Salen Bay Hire

A peaceful paddle in a kayak delivers you to hard-to-reach coves, and perhaps even brings an encounter with a seal or two. Paddle boarding is also a fun choice, and a great way to watch the sunset from a sheltered bay.

Find out how you could enjoy kayaking and paddle boarding on the Isle of Mull, with options in the north, east and south west for you.

Plan a family holiday on Mull that everyone will enjoy with these great tips for things to do, places to go and the best holiday homes to stay in.
Paddle board around Tobermory’s enchanting bay

Paddle boarding in Tobermory Bay

Yachts and fishing boats are a familiar sight in Tobermory’s iconic harbour, as well as the odd inquisitive seal or two. But now you can take to the water in an entirely new way, by enjoying a paddle boarding experience.

Choose between a one to three hour hire period and soak up the views, scenery and sights of the island’s harbour town from the water with Tobermory Paddle Hire.

Paddle boarding at sunset with Salen Bay Hire
Kayaking with Salen Bay Hire

Paddle boarding and kayaking in Salen Bay

Based in picturesque Salen Bay on the island’s east coast, Salen Bay Hire offer single and double kayak hire as well as paddle boards. Every hire comes with a life jacket and paddle, so it’s just a wetsuit to pack with you.

Sheltered from the wind, this is a lovely spot to spend an hour or two paddling and exploring. Enjoy a unique view of the Salen shipwrecks, so often photographed from the road but rarely viewed from across the water.

Fidden beach on the Ross of Mull

Sailing and kayaking on the Ross of Mull

If you’re staying on the Ross of Mull, then you needn’t miss out on the action. In addition to the treasure trove of sheltered coves for wild swimming on Mull, you can take to the water in a sea kayak with Bendoran Watersports. Choose between a half or full day on the water with a guide, or hire a kayak or dingie if you have suitable experience.

Travel Advice for Guests

Latest Travel information  |  FAQs answered

Latest News
If you are unable to travel due to a legal restriction in your particular area of residence (in the U.K. or abroad), we will offer you a transfer or full refund, so please get in touch if that is the case.

Mixed Households – Rules
There are no limits on how many people/households can stay together in self-catering accommodation in Scotland at present.

Ferry
We recommend you book your ferry journey well in advance to ensure you get the sailing you want.  If you do have difficulty getting on the Oban to Craignure sailing, please bear in mind there is a sailing from Lochaline to Fishnish (further north) which is a ‘turn up and go’ service (also run by Calmac). Your journey will be refundable with Calmac if you are unable to travel due to covid restrictions.

Cancellation Policy
In addition to our normal terms and conditions, we have new rules in place owing to the pandemic.  If you are unable to travel to Mull due to a legal requirement by the government (e.g. lockdown in your area, or in Mull), we will offer you a transfer of dates in the first instance and, if that wasn’t agreeable, we will arrange a full refund for you from the owner (and would return our commission element of the fee you paid in full too).

If however, you decide not to travel for any other reason (or if the government advice is advisory, rather than legal), our usual cancellation policy would apply.  That means we will only be able to refund the amount you have paid towards your booking (less an administration fee of £30), if we are able to re-book the accommodation for your period of hire (at the same rate).   We will endeavour to assist guests as best we can through the coming season, and will continue to follow best practice/government advice when it comes to our refund/transfer policy.

Cleaning Protocols
The new cleaning protocols have been passed onto all our property owners and their housekeepers, to allow them to make preparations for receiving guests.  We have put together a general document which we send out to all guests, pre-arrival, to help keep everyone informed and safe, and will give you contact details for the property caretaker/owner, should you have any specific questions.

Please note that in normal circumstances, bed linen is provided at all the properties we let, but at the current time, there are several owners who have implemented changes, and are asking guests to bring their own bed linen, so please check the property information carefully before travelling.

Test Before you Travel
To reduce the risk of Covid-19 being brought to our island communities, the Scottish government is encouraging anyone planning on travelling to the islands to
test before they travel.  You can order lateral flow tests for delivery to your home anywhere and they should arrive within 24-48 hours.  This request from the Scottish government is advice rather than mandatory.

Thank you.
Isle of Mull Cottages

Four Fantastic All-Day Walks on the Isle of Mull

Reconnecting with nature, recharging your batteries and exploring Mull’s most beautiful corners – this is the ambition of many who visit the island, and by simply carving a day out of your itinerary to dedicate to an all-day walk on the Isle of Mull, you can do exactly that.

Here are four ideas to get you started, with one for each corner of the island. Choose one or explore them all – the island is your oyster, enjoy it!

The view as you pass through the wildflower meadow, arriving at the dramatic coastal track.
The ‘false’ beach, with excellent views across to the Treshnish Isles to the west.

North Mull: The Treshnish Headland

This is a great choice for an all-day walk on the Isle of Mull that eases you in gently and rewards you with spectacular views. Beginning from the island’s west coast at the start of the Treshnish headland, just south of Calgary, a track takes you past Treshnish Farm and on towards the Coronation Meadow, where wild orchids and other native flowers grow in the breeze of the Atlantic.

Rounding the coast with views to the Treshnish Isles, you’ll pass over the ‘false’ beach – now a flat, grassy swathe, this was once at sea level! From here, the trail continues past the ruined village at Crackaig, before re-joining the single-track road to return to your starting point.

Rounding the headland as you make your way back towards Reudle.
Ruined villages found along the Treshnish walk, telling of more populous times before the Highland Clearances.

East Mull: Glenforsa and Ben Talaidh

Ben Talaidh in the distance, seen from Glenforsa with its resident Highland cows.
The propellor of the Dakota plane crash of 1945, which struck the mountain.
On your return, you can take an alternative route along the River Forsa.

Standing at almost 750m high, Ben Talaidh towers at the head of Glenforsa, and its iconic, conical peak can be seen from as far away as Tobermory in the island’s north east.

Climbing this Graham comes not only with fantastic scenery and views from the top though, as having followed the river Forsa through the farmed glen below, you’ll ascend past a bothy to the wreckage of a Dakota plane, which crashed into the mountain in 1945.

The summit affords excellent views across the island’s mountainous interior, west towards Loch Ba and Ben More, and east back to the Sound of Mull and mainland Scotland.

As you make your way through the glen, pass the MBA bothy at Tomsleibhe.
A wintry ascent of Ben Talaidh, with spectacular views to Mull’s mountainous interior.

South Mull: Tireregan Nature Reserve

The reward for your efforts is this remote and staggeringly beautiful stretch of coast.
The exquisite white sands of Traigh Gheal, so remote you’ll almost certainly be the only people there.

It always pays to be prepared when you head out walking on the Isle of Mull, but no where is this truer than of the Tireregan Nature Reserve. Although not featuring big ascents, the terrain here is challenging and you’ll navigate thick brush, woodland, bog and bracken as you make for the coast. For this reason, it’s a corner of Mull that often goes unexplored, feeling truly remote and untouched.

The reward for your efforts? A taste of Mull’s true wilderness, a wildlife haven, and one of the most unspoilt and beautiful beaches on the island – Traigh Gheal.

Bog, brush and bracken make up much of the route, best suited to experienced walkers.
Fantastic views as you cross challenging terrain in the Tireregan Nature Reserve.

West Mull: Ardmeanach and The Burg

The northern side of the Ardmeanach peninsula, beyond Balmeanach.
The Ardmeanach peninsula, looking out towards Burg, where the route to the fossil tree leads.

Another of Mull’s wildernesses, the Ardmeanach peninsula extends between Loch Scridain and Loch na Keal on the island’s south west coast. From the Scenic Route to Salen heading north, turn off towards Tiroran just after the small settlement of Kilfinichen and the adventure begins. It’s best to check the tides in advance, as the Fossil Tree at the end of the trail requires a low tide.

As you head west along the peninsula, you’ll pass a memorial cairn and the remains of Dun Bhuirg, affording historical interest along the way. Tracing the coastline, the views are rugged and spectacular. The grand finale of this walk is the Fossil Tree, cast in basalt lava and reached by an equally dramatic ladder bolted to the rocks! The return route retraces your steps, with excellent opportunity to enjoy the local wildlife as you go.

Descend the metal ladder when the tide is out to marvel at the geology and fossil tree.
Stunning rock formations and fossils are striking features on this remote part of the coast.

Find more inspiration for short to all-day walks on the Isle of Mull in our guide, complete with OS maps, route descriptions and photos.

Multi-tiered waterfall on the Ardmeanach peninsula

Discover the Island’s Artisans

Perhaps best known for our abundant wildlife, white sand beaches and buzzy town of Tobermory, there are also many creatives and artists on Mull. Based throughout the island, many work in home studios and workshops, but there are opportunities to see them under one roof too.

Here’s the lowdown to give you food for thought and inspiration for places to visit and keepsakes to take home from artists on Mull.

Beachcombed artwork by Lip na Cloiche, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

Market Treasures

Not limited to locally raised produce, seafood and meat (although these make delicious purchases too), the Tobermory Producer’s Market is also home to a rotation of different artisan makers. Purchase hand-woven tartans here in Tobermory, as well as paintings and artworks, fabrics and gifts and even woodwork from exhibiting makers.

Baile Mor Books, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

Glorious Galleries

Mull certainly holds its own in the Hebrides when it comes to artists and galleries, and there are a number you can visit during your stay. Find several galleries as you work your way down from Breadalbane Street, calling into An Tobar, and then down to the harbourfront in Tobermory, or hit the road and visit the Tin Shed Gallery on the west coast. There’s even a gallery on Iona!

Jewellery by Drift Designs, featured on the Mull and Iona Shop

The Mull and Iona Shop

Another way to get your fix of Hebridean treasures is to pay a virtual visit to the Mull and Iona Shop. Formed in August 2020, the Mull and Iona Shop showcases the unique arts, crafts and local produce out islands have to offer, bringing it all together online and allowing you to shop it all from one website. Most products are handmade by small local artists and are a brilliant way to send a piece of the island to you, wherever you are.

Find more things to do when you visit Mull here.

Exploring one of Mull’s most remote corners: Laggan Deer Forest

The following photographic blog covers one of the Isle of Mull’s more remote and challenging areas, a lack of paths, difficulty navigating and tough terrain make this a serious expedition for the experienced only. This is not a suggested route!

Situated in the Isle of Mull’s south east the Laggan Deer Forest lies to the south west of Croggan on an area of land that is connected to the rest of Mull by two narrow isthmuses, one at Kinlochspelve, another at Lochbuie.

A glance at the map reveals that this is an area with interesting geology, history and some intriguing place names, from Glen Libidil, to Lord Lovat’s Cave.

Our day began with a spectacular sunrise over Loch Spelve, a large sea loch with a narrow opening to the Firth of Lorne at Croggan.

Starting our walk at Kinlochspelve by climbing the rugged hills via Gleann Bheag we began descending into Glen Libidil. There are many signs of former settlements on the hills here, thought to vary in age from the neolithic, to the medieval times up until recent history.

Glen Libidil means deep valley, or more accurately dale, an apt description that perfectly describes the lay of the land. There are areas of interest here for geology fans, including exposed Jurassic rocks and volcanic formations.

Remains of a building with a sunlit Ben Buie in the distance
Looking down into Glen Libidil

Reaching the coast at Glen Libidil there are excellent views over Argyll’s southern islands, including Scarba, Jura, Islay and closer to Mull the long chain of the Garvallachs. Winter gales had washed large quantities of kelp ashore, which was much appreciated by both the red deer and wild goats we saw dining in the area!

The view from the beach at Glen Libidil

From here we followed the coastline heading south east toward Frank Lockwood’s island. The terrain here is beautiful, a mixture of cliffs, gnarled oak trees, waterfalls and raised beaches. The sea views are superb and an eye should be kept open for passing porpoise and otters. To the skies there are common sighting of eagles and the majestic red deer appear to thrive in the area, perhaps justifying the name Laggan Deer Forest.

Also of note along this section of coast are the remains of a shipwreck most probably the RFA Maine a vessel that was being used as a hospital ship when it was wrecked ashore on 21 June 1914 in dense fog whilst sailing toward Oban. The ship struck Frank Lockwood’s island, however the remains of the vessel have now washed up over a very wide area.

Leaving the pebble beach at Glen Libidil
Remains of an atlantic Oak tree
Shipwreck remains are found along the coastline
The pebble beach at Uirigh na Salach, a marker of the start of some difficult coastal terrain

We paused for snacks and coffee at the beautiful pebble beach below Uirigh na Salach past which point we found the difficulty of the coastal terrain led us to backtracking to climb (some very steep ground!) uphill before descending again towards the bay of Port Ohirnie, one of the few sizeable bays along this rugged stretch of coastline and a listed anchorage for boats.

Port Ohirinie has an area of gently sloping ground with mature oak and ash trees along the coast. The beautiful Allt Ohirnie and Allt Bealach Luirginn combine to form a small river which flows into the bay. The remains of a small bothy or possible black house sit to the eastern side of the bay.

Looking back to the coast over some very steep terrain
Port Ohirnie and the view to the east (note the blowhole along the coast)

Continuing on we rounded Rubha nam Fear before the views over Frank Lockwood’s island open up. Frank Lockwood was a Liberal MP of the city of York and was said to be fond of visiting the island from Lochbuie in a rowing boat. The low lying island is host to a variety of birds and must have stunning views back towards Mull’s coast, which is especially rugged and dramatic in this area.

Frank Lockwood’s island

From here onward the terrain again becomes increasingly difficult. passing between huge cliffs and steep boulder and scree fields we headed north aiming for Rubha na Faolinn with plans for exploring some of the incredible geology and features along the way.

The cliffs of An Garradh reach 300m above sea level
Traversing below the cliffs
Shipwreck remains on the coast
From sea level to 270m near Bealach Luirginn

As we neared Lord Lovat’s bay we were optimistic that we may be able to explore Lord Lovat’s Cave. During the 1745 Jacobite rebellion Lord Lovat hid here in a cave with a chamber of around fifty feet in length. Lovat was a Jacobite and clan chief, known to switch allegiances at points he was eventually defeated at the Battle of Culloden and beheaded. During his time int he cave he was helped by the owners of Lochbuie House who supplied with with provisions.

Unfortunately a landslide of rocks has blocked the entrance to the cave, so our exploring was limited! However the area does still has a special feel to it if you are feeling imaginative!

Looking over Lord Lovat’s Bay
The blocked entrance to Lord Lovat’s Cave
Sunset over Laggan and Lochbuie

Our route continued around the coast towards the stunning Laggan and Lochbuie, one of Mull’s most picturesque areas to visit. We opted to explore some of the hill country here too, before finishing our day with assistance of head torches!

If you would like to plan your next day out on the island then you may be interested in our series of more conventional walking routes, all detailed with Ordnance survey maps with routes marked on and photographs of the terrain: Isle of Mull Walking Guide

Outdoor Activities on Mull to Enjoy in Winter

Winter on a Hebridean island brings many things to mind – dramatic tides rolling onto exposed beaches, cosy nights beside the wood burning stove and wrapping up warm to watch for the Northern Lights. Whether your stay is filled with crisp winter sunshine or atmospheric seasonal storms, here are a few outdoor activities on Mull to enjoy in the quiet winter months.

northern lights over mull

1 Enjoy Stargazing

The long dark nights that cloak the Hebrides during the winter months offer a superb opportunity for budding astronomers and stargazers alike. Head out on a clear night and see what you can spot.

For the luckiest, cast your gaze northwards and you may even see the dancing colours of the Northern Lights, which are spotted here throughout the winter months when the solar energy is right. Find out more about stargazing on Mull.

2 Fossil Hunting

Not to collect and take home, but certainly to marvel at. On a bright, calm day, there are two paths to pick from.

For the adventurous, the dramatic route from Tiroran to the Fossil Tree (it’s known as the wilderness peninsula for a reason!) at low tide will take your breath away.

For an easier going amble, the circular walk at Ardtun on the Ross of Mull enables you to enjoy the stunning coastal scenery as you scout out fossil leaf beds, which once stood beside a prehistoric lake!

Silhouette of a red deer stag roaring at sunset on the Isle of Mull

3 Watch for Wildlife

During the winter months, the red deer descend from their home ranges in the hills and are often seen at lower levels, making winter an ideal time to see them up close.

Much of the island’s wildlife remains with us through the winter – the eagles, otters, seals and more call Mull home year-round. And then there are the seasonal visitors, for whom winter signals their season of return – keep an eye out for the rare Great Northern Diver among others.

4 Go Fishing

At this time of year, fisherman’s huts come in especially handy to shelter from the weather if needed. Tackle and Books in Tobermory are the people to ask to secure your permits to fish, with the Mishnish Lochs a pretty spot with shelter if you need it, or the Aros Park lochan, where you can take cover beneath the trees.

Duart Castle standing proudly on an outcrop in south east Mull, seen from the ferry as it approaches Craignure

5 Bag Castles

Make your first Duart Castle – while it closes its doors to visitors over the winter months, you’ll enjoy magnificent views of the castle as you approach Mull on the Oban to Craignure ferry.

From here, several beautiful castles await, some ornate and privately owned, like Glengorm, which can be seen from a distance on the walk to the Bathing Pools, or Torosay Castle, which peeks through the trees on a coastal walk from Craignure.

Others act as relics of the past, like the 16th century Aros Castle, where ruins remain statuesque on the hilltop beside Salen Bay and the Aros estuary. Moy Castle, visited by a beautiful coastal path from Lochbuie, is another castle majestic in its age and well worth the walk to.

6 Step Back in Time

Follow coastal paths to ruined villages that serve as a poignant reminder of the Highland Clearances island-wide. From the Ross of Mull, the path to Shiaba is a stunning, windswept coastal walk with pretty beaches to pass by.

Further north, walk the Treshnish Headland for more spectacular sea views, passing the ruined village of Crackaig as you go. From Tobermory, the walk to Ardmore Point is only a few minutes’ drive, where again, ruined cottages pay testament to times past.

Feeling inspired by these winter activities on Mull? Visit the island at its quietest and enjoy an excellent value winter break – choose from one of our cosy cottages available this winter.

10 Reasons to Visit the Ross of Mull

Whether you’ve booked a cottage in the island’s wild south west or are planning a day trip from Tobermory, discover 10 reasons to explore the Ross of Mull. From beaches to island hopping, wildlife to rocks, there’s plenty to inspire your next holiday on Mull.

Fidden beach on the Ross of Mull

1 Breath-taking Beaches

From Knockvologan’s sheltered coves, dotted with pink granite outcrops, to the glittering seascapes of Uisken and Ardalanish with views to outlying islands, to little known sandy beaches flanked by hills and reached by the adventurous – the Ross of Mull has it all. There are beaches you can park beside and beaches well off the beaten track. There’s even a beach rumoured to be a favourite among the Royals! Choose your favourites to visit with our guide to beaches on the Ross of Mull.

2 Isle of Iona

No where on Mull is it easier to experience the charming island of Iona, than from a cottage on the Ross of Mull. Whether you pick Pennyghael, Ardtun or even Loch Assapol as your location for the week, the short ferry crossing from Fionnphort to Iona is within easy reach. Iona makes an excellent day trip with a visit to the Abbey, a walk to hear the corncrakes in season, or a stroll to the beautiful Bay at the Back of the Ocean.

Sea eagle dives for fish

3 Wonderful Wildlife

Mull is well known as a wildlife capital and the Ross of Mull is no different. Spend some time exploring loch and land with the chance to encounter otters, white tailed sea eagles, golden eagles, red deer and seals. If you’re particularly lucky, you may even spot dolphins or a porpoise passing through the sea lochs, or escorting a local fishing boat back to shore. There are even cottages where you can watch wildlife from the window, with hen harriers often sighted from Keills Cottage.

4 Locally Landed Seafood

The Ross of Mull forms a narrow peninsula, bordered by sea on both sides. The proximity to the coast means seafood is often top of the menu. Enjoy the locally landed catch in a laid-back setting at the Creel Seafood Bar beside the ferry slipway in Fionnphort, or for fine dining, book a table at Ninth Wave.

Mull’s wilderness peninsula with a waterfall in reverse during high winds

5 Wilderness Peninsula

The beautiful waters of Loch Scridain carve their way along the north side of the Ross. Across the water, the dramatic Ardmeanach peninsula comes into view. This wildly beautiful area is easily reached by taking the road signposted the ‘Scenic Route to Salen’, then bearing off beside Kilfinichen Bay, following singposts for Tiroran and the Burg. From the designated parking area, there are dramatic landscapes to explore, with a day-long hike leading you to MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree.

6 Great Geology

This part of Mull has a distinctly different geological makeup to much of the island. Pink granite rocks stand out in the landscape and glow beautifully come sunset. The beaches at Knockvologan and Fidden offer great examples, as does the walk past the disused quarry at Fionnphort. Further along the Ross, you can also explore the shoreline at Ardtun to encounter striking fossil leaf beds.

Carsaig Arches - a challenging walk on the south coast

7 Carsaig Arches

The amazing geology doesn’t stop there, because at Carsaig, arguably one of Mull’s most magnificent natural features awaits – the Carsaig Arches. Reached by a dramatic and nerve-tingling walk along challenging coastline, the route will test your bravery at times, but the reward when you reach the arches is spectacular. Find out more about getting there with our guide to visiting the Carsaig Arches.

8 Crofting Culture

The Ross of Mull has a strong history of crofting. You can still feel the tradition as you explore the local area to this day. Call into the Crofter’s Kitchen at Kintra to stock up on local produce, or take part in a craft workshop at Ardtun’s local willow croft. There’s also the Ross of Mull Historical Centre to explore.

Dramatic basalt columns on Staffa

9 Sailings to Staffa

As well as affording easy access to Iona, you can also sail for Staffa from Fionnphort on the Ross. In early summer, visit to meet the characterful puffins, who will be busy in their burrows raising this year’s young. All year round, boat trips to Staffa promise the magic and drama of experiencing Fingal’s Cave and the dramatic basalt columns the island is famous for.

10 Island Hopping

If visiting Iona and Staffa haven’t quite completed your island-hopping fix, then you can also visit one of Mull’s least explored outlying islands from the Ross of Mull – the Isle of Erraid. At low tide, you can walk across the tidal sandbar on Knockvologan beach to reach Erraid. But do make sure you consult the tide times! Make sure you’re back on Mull before high tide cuts Erraid off. Walk to the island’s disused lighthouse observatory or visit the sandy beach on the island’s south coast.

Inspired to visit the Ross of Mull? Book one of our cottages today and hone in on your perfect spot with our cottage map.

5 of Mull’s Most Spectacular Walks

We’ve all had a little more time than usual to explore the local landscapes lately. It’s been no different here on the Isle of Mull, with many of us heading out to enjoy the coastline, woodlands and glens on our doorsteps. Here, we hope to inspire you to explore the island on foot with some of the best walks on the Isle of Mull.

Choose from these five of our favourites to get you started, from hill walks to wildflower meadows and geological wonders.

1 Summit Ben More

Of course, no guide to the best walks on the Isle of Mull would be complete without a nod to the island’s only munro. Ben More makes a fantastic peak to climb starting from the shore of Loch na Keal at Dhiseig.

In fine weather, enjoy clear skies and fantastic views over Mull’s mountainous interior from the top, as well as excellent panoramas across to Iona, Staffa and the Treshnish Isles as you descend. For a more challenging climb, ascend via Beinn Fada.

Second arch at Carsaig Arches, a challenging hike on Mull

2 Marvel at the Carsaig Arches

One of Mull’s most photographed features by intrepid walkers, the path to the Carsaig Arches is not for the faint hearted, but promises a breath-taking natural spectacle at the end.

It’s best done in fine weather as you hug the exposed, rocky coastline on the there and back route. You may find sure-footed wild goats and red deer keep you company!

Best walks on the Isle of Mull - Treshnish headland

3 Walk among the wildflowers

If you’re staying in a cottage in the north of the island, make a point of planning the Treshnish Point circular walk during your stay. Parking on the west coast of the island, this track leads you around the coastline past pebble beaches, the whisky cave and ruined village of Craickag.

There’s a chance to spot cetaceans off the coast, but what makes this walk most remarkable is the stunning display of wildflowers in early summer.

4 Trek to the Fossil Tree

Keen walkers will relish the opportunity to explore the remote and wild Burg peninsula in the south west of the island.

Parking in the designated area at Tiroran, head out for an all-day hike and experience some of Mull’s most remarkable coastal landscapes and wildlife, as well as the remains of a historic dun.

Consider the tides before setting out to ensure you’ll be able to descend to the Fossil Tree, before retracing your steps.

Best walks on the Isle of Mull - three lochs

5 Venture beyond the Three Lochs

The Three Lochs are a regular pausing point for those enjoying the stunning drive through Glen More, but few venture further than the viewpoint. However, the surrounds of this chain of lochs offer excellent walking opportunities.

Enjoy a low level amble around the lochs themselves, keeping your eye out for hen harriers and short eared owls quartering the grassland. For hill walkers, the climb up Ben Fhada, with the optional addition of Creach Beinn, will offer plenty of interest. Although not always a path well trodden, this is undoubtedly one of the best walks on the Isle of Mull with stunning scenery on both routes.

Discover more fantastic walks on Mull in our extensive guide.

 

How to Have a More Eco-Friendly Holiday on Mull

An island with mountains, lochs and undulating coastline, Mull is a must-visit for nature lovers, wildlife enthusiasts and beach goers. If you want to do your bit to have a more eco-friendly holiday on Mull and preserve the island’s special landscapes, traditions and culture, try these simple tips.

Leave the car at the cottage and walk to Mull's most scenic spots for a more eco-friendly holiday on Mull

Greener travel

Mull has miles and miles of walking tracks, from challenging hill climbs to more leisurely forestry tracks and beach walks. Exploring by foot or bike instantly cuts your carbon footprint, with the bonus of having more time to watch for wildlife and take in the views. Find more inspiration for walking routes on Mull.

For longer journeys, why not make use of the island’s well-connected bus service? Even one journey here or there can help achieve a more eco-friendly holiday on Mull.

You could also book a holiday cottage within walking distance of your must-see attractions. Try Canna overlooking the harbour in Tobermory, Calgary Bay Cottage right beside the beach or Ploughman’s Cottage for epic walks to Shiaba and Kilvickeon Beach.

Dragonsfly Rest, a holiday cottage on Mull with eco-friendly initiatives

Eco-friendly holiday cottages

We’ve got lots of eco-friendly holiday cottages on Mull, but that doesn’t mean going back to basics for a week.

Pet friendly Carnanamish in Tobermory is a contemporary holiday home for eight with stunning sea views. The sustainable measures here are built in to the fabric of the building. For example, the large windows make the most of solar gain, while the air exchange heat pump offers eco-friendly heating.

Likewise, pet friendly Dragonsfly Rest on the Ross of Mull combines a wood burning stove with solar panels to keep the cottage cosy, with temperature controls on each radiator providing all the modern conveniences too.

Highland cow beside Shepherd's Light cottage on Mull

Local produce

Guests often ask us about the best places to do your food shopping on Mull. This can be a great way to plan a more eco-friendly holiday on Mull too. We are fortunate to have a wide range of local producers and purveyors to choose from, ranging from the Tobermory Fish Company to Tobermory Bakery, Inverlussa Shellfish to Isle of Mull Cheese.

There’s also the opportunity to stock up from local growers and producers at the regular Producer’s Markets. These take place in Tobermory, Craignure, Pennyghael and Dervaig. Many also sell direct from the farm, so you can indulge in fresh vegetables from Glengorm Gardens, Hebridean hogget and Highland beef from Ardalanish and pork from the Greenleaves Croft in Ardtun.

The Crofter’s Kitchen and Garden at Kintra is also well worth a visit for local produce and eggs in season. And for those who wish to enjoy the local bounty without cooking themselves, place an order with the Lochbuie Larder. Creators of homemade ready meals, many featuring ingredients from the Lochbuie estate, these are a favourite among our guests.

Book your holiday cottage and start planning your visit to Mull today.