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Your Mull in Photos: Mountains

Ever wondered what Ben More is like from the summit, or what remote peninsulas look like up close? Scree-covered slopes. Snow-topped peaks. Rocky, remote headlands. A hiker’s paradise, Mull has them all. In this blog post, we head off the beaten track to get a fresh perspective of Isle of Mull mountains with some stunning visitor photos shared on our Facebook page, plus some insider tips to help you enjoy them. Do you have a photo we should be including too?

 

border collie dog sits at the top of Ben More, highest mountain on Mull

Photo taken by Matthew Hull

Ben More, Mull’s only munro

Undoubtedly the most famous of Isle of Mull mountains, the summit of Ben More towers a dizzying 966m above the sea. Two of the most popular routes up begin from the scenic shores of Loch na Keal. One of these routes takes on a more challenging ascent first up Beinn Fada and then along the A’Chioch ridge pictured here behind Meg, the collie. Derryguiag Smiddy makes the perfect cottage base camp.

On a clear day, the views from the top are outstanding, but always come prepared. The weather changes rapidly on Mull and you’ll often find Ben More’s head in the clouds. Find out more about climbing Ben More.

 

Green hills covered in bluebells with trees and fields in front

Photo taken by David Goodwin in June 2019

Bluebell-strewn hills

The bluebell display is one of Mull’s most magical natural treasures and makes it well worth booking a cottage in May or June. They’re best seen before the bracken gets too high and shields them from view. And to the surprise of some, while you’ll find enchanting pockets of woodland blanketed in bluebells at Gruline, you’ll also see them decorating much more exposed hillsides.

 

 

pebble and seaweed shoreline with loch and Isle of Mull mountains behind

Photo taken by Ian Butler

view from land across the sea loch to Ben More over north shore of Loch na Keal

Photo taken by Jane Traynor

Low-level vantage points

Isle of Mull mountains don’t always demand that you climb to their summit to be blown away by the views. In fact, you can take in panoramic vistas of Mull’s hills and peaks from sea level. These dramatic pictures were taken looking across Loch na Keal.┬áStay at Kellan Mill Lodge and you could enjoy views like these without even leaving home!

Photo taken by Carol Franklyn

For a similar easy access experience but with a distinctly different feel, plan a drive through Glen More. Pictured here by Carol Franklyn in September this year, the glen is bathed in sunshine – proof that the shoulder season is well worth experiencing too.

 

turquoise blue sea loch leading to rocky ridge and blue skies on Mull

Photo taken by Linda Graham

Remote and rugged peninsulas

Spend any length of time exploring Mull’s 300 miles of coastline and you’ll encounter cliffs, coves and stretches of land that unfurl into dramatic headlands. In fact, you can even stay at a cottage on your own small peninsula over Loch Scridain – Ardchrishnish is the one to book.

But perhaps the most breath-taking peninsula of all is found at Ardmeanach. Located in the remote south west of Mull, you can walk the Burg or even descend down the ladder to the Fossil Tree.

Discover more about the fantastic opportunities to head outdoors with our Mull walking guide.

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