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Holiday Ideas Archive

8 Island Traditions to Experience When You Visit Mull

The unparalleled wildlife and landscapes are well-known reasons to visit Mull, but there’s more to the island than nature alone.

Home to around 3,000 people, Mull has a brilliant community spirit with lots of cultural events and traditions going on. Here are just a few of them.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Hogmanay

Hogmanay, or New Year for those south of the border, is the only excuse islanders need to get together, enjoy good food and have a good old knees-up.

Of course, with such a spirited party comes the dreaded walk home. Why not make it easy and book to stay at a cottage within staggering distance of an island inn?

The picturesque Tilliepestle is located a stone’s throw from the oldest inn on the island, The Bellachroy in Dervaig. Or, you could try Bayview House in Bunessan to start the new year with stunning sea views after a night of merriment at the the local. In Tobermory, revellers are spoiled for choice with the Mishnish, MacGochans and others hosting parties into the wee hours.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Burns Night

On the 25th of January every year, Scots far and wide get together to celebrate Burns Night. A celebration of poet Robert Burns, haggis is top of the menu (check out Ballygown Restaurant who make their own) and, if traditions are upheld, its arrival at dinnertime will be accompanied by a live performance of the bagpipes. It’s also the perfect occasion to sample some of the island’s local whisky, made at the Tobermory Distillery.

Mull Music Festival

From the 25th to the 29th April 2019, the island will be singing with musical talent as Mull Music Festival gets into full swing.

Venues in Tobermory host the majority of the performances. Bands and musicians take over pubs, restaurants and hotels, transforming them into atmospheric live music venues.

You’ll be shoulder-to-shoulder with visitors and locals, enjoying the best of Scottish folk and ceilidh music.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Highland Games

Visit Mull on Thursday 18th July 2019 to experience the island’s annual Highland Games. It’s a day that unites community spirit and competition, with visitors and locals turning out in droves. With piping, Scottish dancing and lots of sporting events, including the iconic caber toss, this is a truly Scottish day out and great fun for all the family. You’ll find 10 more family friendly island activities here.

Usually held at Erray Park, stay at The Croft or Bookend Cottage and all the excitement will be just a short walk away.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Salen & Bunessan Agricultural Shows

Both the villages of Salen on Mull’s east coast and Bunessan in the south west host a traditional agricultural show. The shows usually take place in August and are another excellent family day out. Livestock classes will bring you up close to the island’s famous Highland cows, while the dog and horse shows create quite a spectacle. There are lots of stalls to explore and plenty of delicious opportunities to try local food and drink.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Mull Rally

A long-standing favourite of all Mull’s island traditions is the Mull Rally, which sees the island buzzing with rally cars taking part in timed trials. The Mull Rally takes place in mid-October every year. The island has a bustling feel and there’s plenty to do when you visit Mull, whether spectating the races or making the most of the ceilidhs over the weekend.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

West Over Sea Tobermory Book Festival

A tradition in its infancy, the Tobermory Book Festival launched in 2018. Spear-headed by a literary team of three, the festival offered visitors author meet-and-greets, book launches and readings, as well as live music. It’s an event we hope to see return and grow year-on-year.

Visit Mull and you get more than majestic and wild landscapes, you also experience a thriving island community. Here are 8 ways to enjoy the local culture.

Tobermory Christmas Lights

The turning on of the Christmas lights in Tobermory may be one of the year’s lesser-known traditions for visitors, but what it lacks in tourist publicity it makes up for with charm. The event usually takes place in November.

Come and watch Tobermory’s Main Street light up with festive illuminations and gather round the clock tower and Christmas tree. The shops, restaurants and pubs will be open late, with no shortage of treats to tempt you in. It’s the perfect way to get into the Christmas spirit and enjoy some late night shopping from local, island businesses. A great reason to visit Mull in winter.

 

Find a brilliant holiday cottage for your getaway. If you visit Mull in the winter months, don’t miss out on cottages offering excellent short breaks.

Isle of Mull Photos That Will Take Your Breath Away

Get a new perspective on the Isle of Mull with these dizzy images!

The Isle of Mull has a well deserved reputation as a photographer’s paradise. Little wonder, then, that many locations have been the subject of visitors’ photos time and again.  We took to the skies to discover new perspectives of old favourite locations throughout the Isle of Mull and we hope you enjoy them too.

We are going to focus on the beauty of the locations and the circumstances and timing of the images, perhaps inspiring a visit and stay in one of our hand picked range of holiday cottages on Mull.

Ben More


It was one of those perfect sunny days towards the end of March.  A touch of warmth in the sunshine brings signs of spring to Mull, yet snows still clads the mountains and the days are just beginning to get lighter and longer.  We timed our climb of Ben More to coincide with sunset, which at this time of the year drops behind the Isle of Ulva from this location.  We took the circular route via Beinn Fhada and over the A’Cioch ridge before reaching the summit after dark and heading down the mountain to Dhiseig in the faint afterglow.  The filming was a success with only light wind over the ridge.  We’ve tackled this munro in the winter too – find out about our climb here.

 

Iona



During the work on our guide to Mull’s islands we of course included Iona.  Iona is a emerald gem of an isle with a important historical role that is matched by the richness of the fine machair grasslands, which back the white sandy beaches.  With a population of around 150 people, Iona has one village – Baile Mor – which you see as you approach on the ferry from Mull.  In this view you can see the row of traditional stone cottages, each with a seaward facing garden in front.

 

Knockvologan



There’s no doubt that some of Scotland’s best beaches are on the Isle of Mull.  Be it the famous Calgary beach in the north, or one of the hidden coves on Mull’s south coast, with more than 20 beaches to visit there is something for every occasion.  When working on our Isle of Mull beaches guide we visited one of the the more spectacular stretches of sand at Knockvologan.  It was a still, sunny day in February. At this time of year the sun sets behind the south-west tip of Iona.  The days are shorter and the low angle light provides perfect conditions for picking out the details in the landscape.  This view looking south toward the distant Torran Rocks give a great perspective over the broad sweep of white sands that form the beach.

 

Loch Uisg



In late May, the long days of early summer are well on the way. Mull’s landscape is mainly transformed into a rich verdant green.  At this time rhododendron flowers are in full bloom and nowhere is the display more impressive than along the shoreline of Loch Uisg.  The single track road to Lochbuie skirts the edge of the loch and the whole drive can resemble a giant natural garden at times!  This image is looking west along the line of the Great Glen Fault, which runs under this part of Mull.  The house is Craig Ben Lodge. It’s a beautiful property built in the Bryce Baronial style.

 

Traigh na Cille



Here we jump to early April on north Mull’s west coast and to the beach of Traigh na Cille at Kilninian.  This is one of north Mull’s larger beaches. It is well known for its dark sand sediments, which you can see in this image form a distinct linear banding as the tide rises and falls.  The name of beach means ‘beach of the cell’, as in a monastic cell. This is most likely a connection to the times of St. Columba on Iona and the growth in Christianity in western Scotland.  This view looks to the north past Torloisk and towards Treshnish.

 

Loch na Keal



On the first Sunday in June each year, the Isle of Mull Cycling Club organise and run the Isle of Mull Cyclesportive.  Here you can see Mull cycling club members making their way along the shore of Loch na Keal.  Pictured in late September, this photo is from a promotional video we made for the Sportive. It showcases the outstandingly beautiful route and explains how proceeds from entrance fees go towards good causes in the local community.

 

Iona Ferry, Fionnphort



This image looks over the Isle of Mull’s most westerly point near the village of Fionnphort on the Ross of Mull.  Taken near sunset on a late September evening, the picture shows the Iona Ferry heading to its overnight mooring in the Bull Hole. This is the name for the channel of water that is protected by the small island of Eilean Nam Ban.  The coastline here is made of a distinctive pink granite, which was at one time quarried and used as decorative stone in buildings throughout the world.

 

Eas Fors Waterfall



On the west coast of north Mull you will discover a landscape of distinct terraced strata. In fact, most of the geology of north Mull is comprised of these ‘steps’, caused by volcanic lava flows which set into visible layers.  Where burns and rivers flow down hill they become waterfalls as they pass these layers.  One of the most dramatic is Eas Fors, which cascades straight into the sea at Loch Tuath.  There is a parking area near these falls and a path explores the area – take care near the drop!

 

Port na Ba



Located on the Isle of Mull’s north coast, Port na Ba is a beach of fine white sands, aqua waters and views towards the isles of Rum, Eigg and Skye.  Perfect for a paddle or swim, this photo shows the gently sloping sands and clarity of the sea.  It’s a bird’s eye view that shows Mull’s coastline is beautiful from any angle!

 

River Lussa


Situated in Mull’s south east, the river Lussa is one of Mul’s larger water courses.  The catchment is in Mull’s mountainous interior and the river gains size from tributaries that join from the flanks of Creach Beinn.  After cascading through a series of pools and a small gorge, the river enters the native oak woodland visible in this springtime photo.  The image is taken from a vantage point just higher than the canopy of the trees, affording a view to the distant mountain Beinn Talaidh.

 

Beinn Fhada


Get a new perspective on the wild and beautiful Isle of Mull with these dizzying images, taken from the skies! Check out these photos, from mountain to sea

Our final image in this collection shows a lone walker and dog crossing the long ridge of Beinn Fhada (702m) in the Isle of Mull’s interior.  Mull has a well deserved reputation as one of the best islands for walking and this image typifies the at times wild but always beautiful nature of the island in the winter months.

 

We hope these photos have inspired you to plan that next visit to the Isle of Mull and perhaps a relaxing break in one of our select range of quality holiday cottages.

 

Which of these snapshots of the Isle of Mull do you like best? Have you visited any of these scenic places?

 

 

Large Holiday Houses on Mull: 5 of the Best!

5 of the Best Large Holiday Houses on Mull

Wildlife, beaches, historical attractions. Awe-inspiring mountains, gorgeous glens and breathtaking lochs. Walking, cycling and kayaking – few islands can rival Mull in offering so much to its visitors.

The range of activities to enjoy, as well as the range of places, makes Mull the perfect place for a group getaway or family holiday. With that in mind, we’ve rounded up some of the best large holiday houses on Mull to help you plan your next adventure.

Best for luxury: Gorsten House

Set at the end of a private driveway and boasting a beautiful lochside setting, Gorsten House is the perfect choice if you’re looking for large holiday houses on Mull that have that something special. The only buildings that feature in your view are a castle and lighthouse, and with enormous glass windows to make the most of them from, you’ll enjoy the picturesque landscape at its best.

Inside, the treats continue, with a sauna, steam room and clawfoot baths welcoming guests with warmth and indulgence. The living spaces themselves are appointed and furnished to the highest standards by the property’s artist owner, with playful lighting and patterns to surprise.

Gorsten House sleeps eight people. Available from £1,200 per week.

 

Best for big families: Macquarie House

With flexible accommodation for up to 10 people, a kitchen diner, large dining room and multiple sitting rooms, the charming stone Macquarie House makes the ideal choice for families looking for large holiday houses on Mull. There’s also a convenient utility room for coats and boots after a busy day exploring the scenery around Loch Ba.

There’s no need to worry about entertaining the kids on rainy days, either. Inside, you’ll find a pool table, table tennis, board games and books to keep everyone having fun. And if you do head outside, in the summer months both salmon and sea trout fishing, as well as boat trips, can be arranged.

Macquarie House sleeps 9-10 people. Available from £995 per week.

 

Best for sea views: The Old Ferry House

Grasspoint is a truly beautiful spot on Mull – you’ve probably driven down the narrow tracks to reach it yourself if you’ve visited the island before. But why limit yourself to a short visit when you could stay right here? The Old Ferry House enables you to do just this, located in what is undeniably one of Mull’s best locations.

The stone house has character and charm aplenty, plus a cosy log burner to keep you toasty. Step outside and you’re right on the water’s edge, with rock pools and a fishing pier to enjoy. With the water comes wildlife. Keep your eyes peeled for sea eagles and hen harriers by air and porpoises and dolphins in the water.

The Old Ferry House sleeps 8-10 people. Available from £995 per week.

 

Best for loch-front living: Ormsaig Cottage

Head to the south-west of Mull and you’ll find Ormsaig Cottage, perched on the shores of Loch Scridian. It’s the perfect choice for large holiday houses on Mull to share with your favourite people.

Imagine sociable evenings in front of the open fire, with soft piano music played live in the background. How about enjoying dinner with family and friends while views of the Atlantic Ocean beckon from the window? Or a gentle group stroll to the nearby village of Bunessan, just in time for a pub lunch… Book Ormsaig Cottage and you can enjoy all of this and more!

Ormsaig Cottage sleeps nine people. Available from £695 per week.

 

 

Best for grandeur: Craig Ben Lodge

Planning a group getaway to celebrate something special? Whether you’re looking for large holiday houses on Mull for a birthday, anniversary or simply some family time, the baronial Craig Ben Lodge offers just the right level of luxury for the occasion.

With sumptuous interiors, carved wooden fireplaces and stately home style, not forgetting the turret outside, Craig Ben Lodge is bound to impress. And that’s before we’ve mentioned its exclusive location on the side of Loch Uisg, with a mountain rising up behind it…

Craig Ben Lodge sleeps 10 people. Available from £995 per week.

 

Find the perfect place for your holiday today and make the family getaway you’ve been talking about happen. We make it easy to find the right holiday cottage for you with our large holiday houses on Mull.

 

Have you stayed in any of our large holiday houses on Mull? Which was your favourite?

5 of Mull’s Best Beaches to Explore in 2018

Being an island off the west coast of Scotland, the Isle of Mull has no shortage of stunning beaches to tempt you. Here, we travel around the coast to bring you five of Mull’s best beaches. Ready to find inspiration for your next island getaway?

Ardalanish Beach, South West Mull

If you’re staying on the Ross of Mull, you’re in prime position to visit Ardalanish Beach. It’s easy to reach from the car park close to Ardalanish Weavers. Once you’re on the sand, the beach offers a lovely walk with excellent coastal and hill views. The beach is surrounded by sand dunes but, if you can tear your eyes away and look up, it’s not unheard of tospot a white-tailed sea eagle here too! Warm up afterwards with a cup of coffee (and perhaps a new blanket) at Ardalanish Weavers.

7 Must-See Historical Attractions on the Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull is famed for many things. A charming harbour town, breathtaking beaches and abundant wildlife are only the beginning. It is also an island of great history, where much of it has been carefully preserved. Plenty of historical attractions remain on the island on display for visitors to see.

Here, we round-up seven brilliant historical attractions for you to visit on Mull. From castles to clans and old crofter’s cottages, you’ll find many memorable ways to step back in time on the island.

5 of the Best Ways to Spend Rainy Days on Mull

Whether you’ve visited Scotland and its many islands before or not, news of the nation’s frequent spells of wet weather travels fast. But while it’s also no stranger to sunshine, the Isle of Mull is an island borne of exactly such weather systems. The waterfalls, rivers and verdant, green landscapes are in part carved out and created by rainy days on Mull, so the wet conditions could even be something worth celebrating.

If you’d like to make the most of your visit, whatever the weather, then try these five ideas for damper days. With something for everyone, from families to crafters to wildlife enthusiasts, your day will be anything but a wash out.

Self-Catering Holidays on Mull: Where to Buy Food During Your Stay

Self-catering holidays on Mull are arguably the best way to explore the island if you want to balance luxury and flexibility. Our portfolio of 80 hand-picked cottages boast some of the best views on the island, and you can choose the one with an interior to suit your style.

You won’t be tied to your hotel’s restaurant this way, so you can eat whatever you want, whenever you want, with the option to eat out any time you fancy it too. To help you make the most of your island getaway, here we round up Mull’s impressive offering of stores, farm shops, produce markets and even homemade ready meals delivered to your door!

How to Choose the Best Holiday Cottages on Mull

Whether you come for the wildlife, the untouched landscapes or the colorful charm of Tobermory, the first step to planning your holiday on Mull is to choose where on the island you actually want to stay.

From beaches to loch shores and remote retreats, there are many idyllic holiday cottages on Mull for you to make your base. And wherever you choose, the beauty of this island is that nowhere is out of reach. Hop in the car and the entire island is within reach (and a few others too, if you don’t mind swapping the car for a boat!).

Here, we share six of our favourite locations for holiday cottages on Mull to help you find the best one for you. And if you know what you want to see but not where to go to see it, get in touch with our family-run business to pick our brains for ten years’ worth of local knowledge. With an exclusive collection of over 80 cottages on the island, choose your destination and your perfect island getaway won’t be far away.

Planning a trip to the Isle of Mull? Experience the freedom, luxury and scenery you desire with a stay at one of our holiday cottages on Mull

A Visit During Autumn On Mull

Autumn on Mull can be spectacular, from its starry, dark skies to the changing colours of the landscape and the wildlife waiting to be discovered...

Author looking over Loch na Keal near Kellan Mill Lodge

I was a latecomer to Mull. Shamefully late in fact. Having moved to Scotland in 2003 and consciously making the decision at that point to explore every corner of my adopted home, it was 12 long years before I set foot on the island. It wasn’t until my second visit that I experienced autumn on Mull.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

My first obstacle was an earnest but naïve fixation on climbing munros (Scotland’s 282 hills over 3000ft) and ONLY munros. I did so with single-minded determination for the first few years. In so doing I completely overlooked the walking potential of rugged ‘lesser’ hills on the islands or the unique atmosphere and challenges of their wild, convoluted coastlines… two things Mull has in spades. But when that fixation happily abated, a second and unexpected obstacle took its place.

Remote Holiday Cottages in Scotland

One of the special things about being on an island is that sense of removal from the hustle and bustle of mainland life.  With water all around, the peace and quiet and breathtaking views can begin to work their magic!  We’ve put together a selection of our most remote holiday cottages on the Isle of Mull. These cottages offer guests a sense of total privacy and solitude in the most stunning of scenery.